Response 556873819

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A vision for culture in Scotland

1. What is your view of the Vision as set out above?

Please select one item
Ticked Support the vision
Don’t support the vision
Don’t know

2. If you have any further comments on the Vision, please provide them below. What do you like, or dislike, or what would you change?

If you have any further comments on the Vision, please provide them below. What do you like, or dislike, or what would you change?
We welcome and support the vision as being ambitious, challenging and embracing. North Ayrshire culture is shaped by the people who live here. We want people to innovate, enjoy and inspire others. We want to develop excellent cultural experiences and widespread participation with our communities. Our ambition is to ensure that everyone can take part in cultural and creative experiences. We are exploring opportunities to share and widen their access to audiences and local employment with our partners in Creative Conversations, our Arts and Creativity network. In particular North Ayrshire Council welcomes the recognition within the Vision that People who create have the right to earn a fair living from artistic and culture professional pursuits. We agree that there is no one story of culture in or from Scotland and that individuals and communities contribute to and shape their own culture and that is reflected in our own ambition statement. Our communities face significant challenges in some areas and each have their own unique identity, festivals, heritages, cultural traditions and voices. The Marymass festival in Irvine is a medieval religious festival and horse fair. Nowadays it takes place over 12 days in August. Over the festival period there are many concerts, exhibitions, talks, competitions, entertainments including fireworks and a funfair, all organised by local community groups. The traditional crowning of the Marymass Queen includes Scotland’s only entirely horse-drawn vehicular parade, which continues for a mile up to the moor for horse racing and hotly contested greasy pole-climbing competition. It differs greatly from the Largs Viking Festival, Festival of the Sea in Saltcoats, West Kilbride’s Scarecrow festival, the Chainsaw festival in Beith, Kilwinning’ Archers’ annual Papingo shoot, the Country Music Festival on Cumbrae or Feis Arainn. Each one shaped by the community for the community.

Transforming through culture

3. What is your view of the ambition, ‘Transforming through culture’?

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Ticked Support ambition
Don’t support ambition
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5. Please provide comments on the aims and actions under this ambition. What do you like, or dislike, or what would you change?

Please provide comments on the aims and actions under this ambition. What do you like, or dislike, or what would you change?
We work closely with our Youth Team and our schools to extend cultural and creative experiences. We value the empowerment which our young people find in self-expression, emotional development and fun discover through cultural and creative experiences. This builds confidence, leadership and empathy and this is helping to develop resilience in our communities. In the last three years we have held 317 creativity workshops and reached 4755 participants, as part of the Holidays Lunch time activities to address holiday hunger and provide opportunities for cultural participation. Tidelines, our community led book festival, has been running for 5 years. To date over 80 author events have been held and these have attracted an audience of over 4000. It has a dedicated schools programme which has reached over 4100 pupils over the course of 5 book festivals. The volunteers have sustained the ability to organise and attract major authors like Christopher Brookmyre and Graham Obree to rural communities and this helps to address the barrier of rural disadvantage to participation in the arts. The inaugural Illumination event, led by the Scottish Maritime Museum and North Ayrshire Council, took place at Irvine Harbourside as part of our celebration of St Andrew’s Day. The grant supported us to introduce Gaelic culture via the youth arts provision. Impact Arts led the Lantern Parade which brought in excess of 200 young people to the event. The Impact Arts Gaelic Arts Worker led sessions in three local schools and in the Harbour Arts Centre. The participants created lanterns for use in the parade, all decorated in traditional Celtic designs. In addition to the parade the incredible high wire acrobatic performance in the Linthouse Building was performed to Gaelic music. Fresh from Celtic Connections, the performers played to the promenading audience as the acrobats and dancers performed above. The Capall Dorcha Company was set up by a local young man from Ardrossan who, supported by the Council, was keen to develop cultural opportunities for the communities of North Ayrshire. He now has two organisations – a theatre company – Capall Dorcha and an educational arm - Ensemble. Ensemble has recently been awarded Big Lottery funding from Our Place to engage in and deliver a range of cultural events and activity in Ardrossan. As a result:  1000 audiences attended Night of Broadway  Night on Broadway is now offered across Scotland  1100 young people took part in Ensemble, an outreach programme In particular North Ayrshire Council welcomes the explicit references to the transformative and healing power of cultural experiences in addressing the challenges of children who have experiences stressful and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). This fits well our own work on ACEs, our commitment to being a child-centred council and the Year of Young People. Along with many other local authorities we have found it challenging to provide the funding support which culture and creativity deserves to flourish. We agree that a more strategic approach is required and would welcome discussions on how we can work more closely together to help our communities improve access to cultural experiences run centrally with public funding but often out of the reach of smaller communities facing rural disadvantage, the vagaries of rural transport and social isolation. We are delighted to have been successful in aspiring to and receiving public funding support from a wide range of partners like Creative Scotland’s Place Partnership, Scottish Government/Scottish Book Trust’s funding for Digital Storytelling, Edinburgh International Book Festival Booked! and Scottish Government/Scottish Library and Information Council’s funding for the SongBird initiative in libraries. These all help bring cultural experiences to local communities. We support the aims listed but would have reservations about effectiveness of the new cultural leadership post within such a broad policy environment and the challenges faced by Creative Scotland. There is no doubt that defining and measuring Aim 2 is complex and requires national approaches and rigour. We are not convinced that the Action will deliver the Aim and that further consideration would be helpful.

Empowering through culture

6. What is your view of the ambition, ‘Empowering through culture’?

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Ticked Support ambition
Don’t support ambition
Don’t know

8. Please provide comments on the aims and actions under this ambition. What do you like, or dislike, or what would you change?

Please provide comments on the aims and actions under this ambition. What do you like, or dislike, or what would you change?
Culture and creativity fosters a sense of place, belonging and community identity and is pivotal to the physical and social regeneration and economic growth of the area. We want to provide opportunities for creative and cultural experiences to challenge ideas, explore opinions and redefine personal understanding. Community empowerment underpins our approach and our Cultural Ambition is to forge links between creativity and culture, health and wellbeing, economic growth and tourism. Each are intrinsically linked to the other and each has proven, individual benefits. The Arran Theatre and Arts Trust is a community arts organisation on the Isle of Arran. The trust deliver and coordinate many aspects of the arts on the Island. Runners up two years in a row in the Creative Place Awards, the committee were successful in securing finding for a coordinators post. Part of the post is funded through the Place Partnership with Creative Scotland. The work of this individual is a valuable asset to the islands creative community and we continue to work in partnership with them to increase sustainability across the creative community. The Barony, West Kilbride, is a community ran craft and exhibition space. North Ayrshire Council support the Board and staff at The Barony throughout the year to deliver a quality programme whilst supporting the infrastructure and building capacity within the Board. We have worked in close partnership with a variety of organisations including Creative Scotland, to pull together the correct supports and interventions so sustain this resource and embed it as a valued resource for the community. Our community partnerships are growing vibrant participation in local communities with new audiences. These include Centrestage at Ardeer, Pennyburn, Castlepark Fullarton and Kilbirnie; Barrfields in Largs and Impact Arts. Widespread involvement among communities in a variety of the arts increases community spirit, self-worth and equity. The passion for local history is evident in the members of Kilwinning Heritage Society. The community group have been active in Kilwinning for many years and goes from strength to strength. They hold regular meetings and talks on local topics. Throughout the year they visit many other heritage sites and attend talks and presentations across Scotland. In 2012 they hosted a very successful community dig which enabled local people to play an active part in the archaeological exploration in and around the grounds of Kilwinning Abbey. Their commitment to Kilwinning Abbey Tower is a particular strength and a team of volunteers open the tower to the public throughout the summer. In 2017 over 100 volunteers and local supporters attended the 200th anniversary celebration of the commencement of the building of the Tower. The annual Fèis tooks place on Arran each July run by local volunteers. Children from across Arran and across all age groups come along to Arran High School for a week long event culminating in a final performance in the schools wonderful theatre. Over 100 children attend over the week and take part in language classes, visual arts sessions, chanter, clarsach, fiddle and percussion workshops as well as drama and singing. Supported by an amazing team of leaders from across Scotland the children are immersed in Gaelic language and culture and share their learning with a very appreciative audience. The Open Art Exhibition takes place each year in the Racquet Hall in Eglinton Country Park. This long-standing highlight in the cultural year is organised and delivered entirely by volunteers. Each year in excess of 100 works of arts by professional and local artists, as well as students and young people are presented for viewing and sale for 2 weeks. The hard work of the volunteers and park-setting make this a popular and accessible way of sharing the richness of the visual arts. The Ardrossan Castle Heritage Society took their dream of restoring their civic pride through a range of projects to celebrate their local ancient monument. The group have worked with a range of partners, including HES, Heritage Lottery and Big Lottery Our Place, to hold archaeological digs, guide the project which secured the castle walls, worked on interpretation and signage, created an e-book and guide for local people, created a mini visitor centre and hosted three successful medieval carnivals. We support the aims listed and would like to see the public funding at the disposal of national agencies and the national lottery used to not just achieve these but to do so in a way which addresses inequality. Funding should be distributed in a more targeted way to increase equity, in terms of accessing cultural experiences, and provide greater assistance to communities facing the greatest financial challenges.

Sustaining culture

9. What is your view of the ambition, ‘Sustaining culture’?

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Ticked Support ambition
Don’t support ambition
Don’t know

11. Please provide comments on the aims and actions under this ambition. What do you like, or dislike, or what would you change?

Please provide comments on the aims and actions under this ambition. What do you like, or dislike, or what would you change?
Over the past five years we’ve been working with our creative artists and communities to forge a Cultural Partnership, Creative Conversations. Together with our Creative Scotland Place Partnership, this provides a vibrant network for collaboration, experimentation and growth. It creates a strong foundation for artists and creative groups. Its work includes identifying new audiences as well as potential participants in the arts from within our diverse communities and offering the support they need to thrive. Creative Conversations is shaping a sustainable future for culture in North Ayrshire. Each of our localities currently has different capacity, assets and support needs. We want to ensure that our plans are developed, delivered and owned by a community of artists and creative individuals and complement the ambitions of the new Locality Partnerships. Workshop & Artists Studio Provision Scotland provide affordable studio accommodation for artists at the Courtyard Studios in Irvine. Many of the artists are regular participants in Creative Conversations or have individual exhibitions in the nearby Harbour Arts Centre. 17 Artists 6 Art forms 10 group Exhibitions 13 Open weekends On an annual basis the artists collectively deliver a striking exhibition in the Harbour Arts Centre. The gallery in the centre gives the artists a space to collectively showcase the amazing and diverse work they undertake. The Council coordinates the North Ayrshire Museum Forum which is made up of the Scottish Maritime Museum and our partner independent museums from across North Ayrshire. There are 12 local museums represented and regularly attending. The meetings offer support with related issues and opportunities for training. The group meet about 6 times a year and have worked together to produce joint publicity and hold information and training sessions with Museums and Galleries Scotland We are already working with economic development partners, Team North Ayrshire business advisers, the regeneration team and Business Gateway, including specialists in social enterprises, to develop the growing numbers of those embarking on a career in creativity at various stages in life. We want to define what opportunities currently exist, explore emerging international markets and what can be done with partners to support progression and promotion. Our research base is growing with economic impact studies and work carried out by The Hunter Centre for Entrepreneurship at Strathclyde University and links to The Hatchery in Dundonald, with plans for increased investment in and support for creative industries and social enterprises within the new Quarry Road Irvine development. Our ambition is to provide the support networks and nurturing environments which help to develop excellence. This is best achieved with the knowledge and experience of fellow artists and creative people from North Ayrshire and beyond. North Ayrshire Council supports the aims listed and particularly welcome the proposals to explore new funding models. Again we would ask that this is directed towards the areas where there is greatest need as the larger centres of population have many more opportunities to attract funding. The creation of a Cultural Sustainability Fund for rural Scotland and the most deprived communities would be very welcome.

Delivering A Culture Strategy for Scotland

12. Please provide details of any examples of good work and best practice, from Scotland or internationally, that you think could be included in the final strategy? We are interested in a range of different approaches.

Please provide details of any examples of good work and best practice, from Scotland or internationally, that you think could be included in the final strategy? We are interested in a range of different approaches.
The McDougalls Theatre Company was formed in Ayrshire in 2014 by director and performer Ryan Moir. They have gained a reputation for producing quality and engaging theatre for children and families, with a particular loyal following in North Ayrshire. In the last year, the company has played to 20,000 children, some of whom attended their Christmas shows at the Harbour Arts Centre in December 2016 and 2017. Their recent schools tour of “The Green Machine” a touring musical show for eco-schools played in the region of 10,000 children along across the Ayrshire council areas and beyond. The company currently contracts 4 North Ayrshire based performers, with 2 staff responsible for admin and technical. Since last year, the appeal of The McDougalls as a family theatre experience has taken them far beyond North Ayrshire, with tours in Aberdeenshire, the Highlands and Skye. The company are currently embarking on their first UK wide tour with "Treasure Hunt" as well as schools engagements of "The History Mystery" educational show. Most recently the UK Theatre Net rated The McDougalls a 5 star children's company. Ayrshire Operatic Experience is an organisation set up by local, Irvine man David Douglas with interests from Celtic Storytelling to Scots Language opera. His work is frequently a partnership between professional opera singers and community cast and this peer learning is empowering. The Gaelic Opera & Scots Opera programme which took place in March & August 2017 saw 63 primary school groups participating and experiencing opera for the first time. The result was 4 events in Irvine with over 600 audience members and 2 in Saltcoats with an audience of 300, many who would be hearing a seeing opera for the first time. David has also had a request from the National Library of Scotland for a copy of translation of the Magic Flute which will be archived and mention the Harbour Arts Centre as the venue of this world’s premier. The Information and Culture team commissioned the Gaelic Opera project in partnership with Ayrshire Operatic Experience and nationally renowned storyteller Tony Bonning. The work focussed on St Peter’s Primary School in Saltcoats and involved their primary 6 class. The group of children engaged with the project through p6 and into p7. Doing a focussed piece of work with the one class allowed for deeper engagement and enhanced learning. In the course of the project the children heard Gaelic fables and traditional stories. These in turn inspire them to write their own tales and legends. Tony worked with their ideas and created a story. David Douglas of Ayrshire Operatic Experience then took the story and with the children wrote songs to pepper through the tale. The combination of the story and the songs then created a final piece for performing. The children took part in storytelling sessions, creative writing, clarsach, and song writing to assist in the co production of the opera. They also took part in drama and dance workshops. The project culminated in a performance in the newly refurbished Saltcoats Town Hall on the 28th of March. The dress rehearsal was performed to the pupils of the upper primary who came to watch the result of their peers work. The evening performance was delivered to a capacity audience that included, family, friends and teachers. Key officers from NAC Education and Youth Employments 1 + 2 initiative were joined by staff from Information and Culture. The final performance saw the children perform alongside the professional opera singers, Esther Swift the harpist and dancers. They danced, sang and led the narration through the event. The Gaelic language was peppered across all of the work and in particular the music. Largs Gaelic Choir joined the performers for the second half and the audience were introduced to another amazing, local Gaelic cultural experience. The feedback from the pupils and the school staff was positive and indeed was discussed during the 2017 Community Learning and Development Inspection led by HMIE. Two Digital Storytellers in Residence ran a new Scottish Book Trust pilot project in North Ayrshire aimed at helping people get digitally connected by sharing their stories. The digital stories were created by various community groups during a 6 month period and are emotional and insightful. Filmmakers Jim Gibb and Sabine Hellmann were based at Saltcoats Library and worked with participants, often people currently not engaged digitally, to develop their skills and confidence, and also to build their understanding of how being confident online can improve their lives. Digital storytelling involves using iPads and selected apps to create images, video, animation and audio which ultimately comes together to allow participants to tell their own unique story in the form of a short film (2-5 minutes). The content is now showcased on a Vimeo channel https://vimeo.com/channels/storybirdproject. The stories included narratives about families, life in our communities, mental health, addiction and content from Stevenston’s Creative Writers’ group. The StoryBird is an important was of demonstrating that everyone’s experiences contribute to our heritage and that the voices and experiences of people from local communities, traditionally least likely to participate and find themselves represented in the cultural life and artefacts of the area, are valued and preserved. This project has made a significant contribution to the living, growing local history resource within the library and training the library staff in the techniques has led to sustainability. The three libraries within the Garnock Valley; Beith, Dalry and Kilbirnie are developing makerspaces, funded by the Ayrshire LEADER’s European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development. The main makerspace is located in Dalry, with satellite makerspaces in the others. A library makerspace is an exciting concept where a range of activities can take place. This could be from traditional crafts such as knitting to cutting edge technology such as 3D printing. The library makerspace offers the chance to learn new skills, with free access to tuition and equipment and the opportunity for the local community to volunteer to share knowledge. The activities include robotics, coding, digital art and animation, digital storytelling, music and jewellery making. We have linked up with our social enterprise team to encourage business start-ups.

13. What can you or your organisation do to support the vision, aims, ambitions and actions of the strategy?

What can you or your organisation do to support the vision, aims, ambitions
North Ayrshire Council is focused on widening local access to culture from the central contribution of the Harbour Arts Centre. The Harbour Arts centre has a strong programme of Visual Arts Exhibitions offering a local opportunity to experience a high quality of work. 95 Exhibitions 73 Artists 34 Community Groups Over 40,000 visitors Included in the exhibition programme is a diverse range of medium and a wide range of different artists, both local, national and international. This year saw an exhibition of works by Pat Kramek, a Stevenston based artist, working in acrylic and inspired by the Scottish landscapes. Following her exhibition was Futureproof 2018, an annual showcase selected from Scotland’s photography degree and Fine Art courses. Work was selected from the art schools of Glasgow and Edinburgh, City of Glasgow College, Napier University (Edinburgh), Edinburgh College, Duncan of Jordanstone (Dundee), and Grays School of Art (Aberdeen). Simultaneously on show was ‘art of the future’? Initially on display in The National Gallery – Edinburgh – this striking exhibition sees young people from across Scotland deliver an imaginative and innovative response to this question. Their original artworks are the outcome of a ‘mail art’ project, which got young Scots talking about the issues that are shaping their futures. The display, which mimics a mail order warehouse, includes a brave street performance about mental health, an inventive short film about the perils of social media, and an ‘unbearable teenager’. The artworks were created from materials delivered to the participants via a contemporary art ‘tool kit' in a box. Regeneration in North Ayrshire communities has seen the development of new or improved venues to bring culture to the heart of local communities. Our performance spaces include Saltcoats Town Hall, the Irvine Townhouse, Trinity Church, the Garnock Campus, and community partners such as Fullarton Connexions or the Fullarton Community Centre. The rapid growth of new events on Cumbrae and Largs, as well as the Irvine Harbourside provide economic and cultural opportunities for culture and creativity. Arran is using North Ayrshire’s Place Partnership with Creative Scotland to develop access and its creative network. Initiatives such as Ayrshire Youth Arts Network, Garnock Connections bring new partners together to innovate and share. The pressure on local government finances means we have had to fundamentally shift our role from being a leading provider of culture in our communities to an enabling and facilitating role, working in close partnership with our many cultural and creative practitioners to ensure access to a wide range of culture and creative experiences. This has been a rich and rewarding learning curve to see our communities’ enthusiastic response. Our role is to provide them with a central network through Creative Conversations, a regular supply of information, access to local facilities and advice about funding.

14. What do you think success for the strategy will look like?

What do you think success for the strategy will look like?
- Richness, vibrancy and diversity in the cultural and creative output of the nation. - A robust range of performance measures demonstrating positive trends in participation, social value and economic impact. - Clear national leadership through a cultural and creative agency which has a well-defined role and is in line with the views of the creative and cultural community it serves. -A wider range of individuals and communities engaged in cultural activity.

Monitoring the Impact of the Strategy

15. What is your view of the proposed approach to monitoring and evaluating the strategy set out in section 5?

Please select one item
Ticked Support approach
Don’t support approach
Don’t know

16. If you have further comments on the proposed monitoring and evaluation approach, please provide them below.

If you have further comments on the proposed monitoring and evaluation approach, please provide them below.
The proposal for the Measuring Change Group suggests a wide membership. One of the biggest challenges facing it will be to develop shared definitions and performance measurement framework, especially in assessing the impact of the Strategy on the quality of highly varied art forms. The subjectivity involved in assessing the value of creativity will be a challenge for the Group. The draft Cultural Strategy sets out the approach for the work which the Measuring Change Group will undertake, however it lacks detail on which to judge its effectiveness in monitoring the impact of the Strategy. We can support the approach and would welcome involvement in the development of rigorous assessment.

Other comments

17. Please use this section to provide any other comments that you wish to share about the strategy.

Please use this section to provide any other comments that you wish to share about the strategy.
Nothing further to add

Impact Assessments

18. Do you think the partial Equality Impact Assessment has identified where the strategy might impact on people differently depending on characteristics such as age, disability, gender, race, religion or belief, sexual orientation or gender identity?

Please select one item
Ticked Yes
No
Don't know

19. If you have further comments on the Equality Impact Assessment, please provide them below. For example, what would you add or change?

If you have further comments on the Equality Impact Assessment, please provide them below. For example, what would you add or change?
The Strategy positions culture as central to progress in health and wellbeing; economy; education; reducing inequality and realising a greener and more innovative future. It seeks to empower individuals and communities through culture and supports an extended and inclusive view of culture. It celebrates the diversity of the many cultures and heritages which exist in Scotland. The draft Cultural Strategy has been pre-screened and undergone a partial Equality Impact Assessment. This is on the Scottish Government’s consultation portal. We acknowledge the work which has already been carried out in analysing the data and through consultation. Our concern is that rural inequalities and the barriers of rural disadvantage to participation are under-recognised. Funding should be distributed in a more targeted way to increase equity, in terms of accessing cultural experiences, and provide greater assistance to communities facing the greatest financial challenges.

20. Do you think the partial Children’s Rights and Welfare Impact Assessment sets out how the proposals presented in the strategy might impact on the rights and welfare of children?

Please select one item
Ticked Yes
No
Don't know

21. If you have further comments on the Children’s Rights and Welfare Impact Assessment, please provide them below. For example, what would you add or change?

If you have further comments on the Children’s Rights and Welfare Impact Assessment, please provide them below. For example, what would you add or change?
North Ayrshire Council is proud of our commitment to being a child-centred council and our actions to support the Year of Young People. Our decisions are assessed for their impact on Children and Young People. The draft Cultural Strategy has been pre-screened and a partial Children’s Rights and Welfare Impact Assessment, These are on the Scottish Government’s consultation portal. We welcome the consultation which has taken place with young people and pledge to embed the UNCRC (United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child) and the SHANARRI wellbeing indicators (Safe, Healthy, Achieving, Nurtured, Active, Respected, Responsible and Included) into the approach suggested in the draft Strategy. There is a lack of data about the impact of culture and creativity on specific groups of children and young people. This needs to be addressed by the Measuring Change Group. Supporting culture and creativity from an early age will provide the opportunity for the longest return on investment, however the development of cultural excellence or high productivity can be a very lengthy process to measure. Our other concern is that it is impossible to calculate the socio-economic value of involvement in cultural programmes on individual health and well-being.

22. How do you think this strategy might impact upon people on low incomes, people living in deprived areas, people in material deprivation, people with no / or low wealth and people from different socio-economic backgrounds? Please provide comments below.

How do you think this strategy might impact upon people on low incomes, people living in deprived areas, people in material deprivation, people with no / or low wealth and people from different socio-economic backgrounds? Please provide comments below.
Increasing equity is one of the North Ayrshire Council's core values. The principles of equality and fairness are central to all of our activities. The draft Cultural Strategy has been pre-screened and a partial Equality Impact Assessment. This is on the Scottish Government’s consultation portal. The lack of diversity in the cultural sector and economic disadvantage are recognised within these. The partial Equality Impact Assessment refers to the Fairer Scotland Duty on public bodies to ‘pay due regard to reducing inequality of outcomes caused by socio-economic disadvantage when making strategic decisions’. We would now expect to see changes to be made to funding allocations to reflect a far greater share of resources to widen participation in culture and creativity in less affluent parts of Scotland. In particular there is a focus on funding culture and creativity with the aim of achieving excellence rather than culture and creativity produced for social and capacity-building benefit. Without the investment to support the aspiration, the strategy will not achieve its potential.

23. Do you think the partial Business and Regulatory Impact Assessment identifies how the proposals presented in the Strategy might impact on businesses, the third (voluntary) sector or have any regulatory impact?

Please select one item
Ticked Yes
No
Don't know

24. If you have further comments on the Business and Regulatory Impact Assessment, please provide them below. For example, what would you add or change?

If you have further comments on the Business and Regulatory Impact Assessment, please provide them below. For example, what would you add or change?
The Strategy sits within the Scottish Government’s wider, high-level vision for culture and its overall purpose to “focus government and public services on creating a more successful country, with opportunities for all of Scotland to flourish, through increasing sustainable economic growth.” We welcome the consultation which has already taken place with various stakeholders. We recognise the fragility of cultural and creative economy for those trying to make a living, often working freelance, the need for the development of skills and the importance of community and leadership. Through our Creative Conversations we are working with our creative community to bring them together and give them a platform for support and development. We are using our network of economic development partners, Team North Ayrshire business advisers, the regeneration team and Business Gateway, including specialists in social enterprises, to develop the growing numbers of those embarking on a career in creativity at various stages in life.

About you

What is your name?

Name
Rhona Arthur

Are you responding as an individual or an organisation?

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Individual
Ticked Organisation

What is your organisation?

Organisation
North Ayrshire Council