Response 964381354

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Section 119: Food Growing Strategy Guidance for Local Authorities - Scope & Goals

21. Are paragraphs 10.1 to 10.6 of the FGS statutory guidance clear and understandable, to allow the local authority to deliver its statutory obligations under Part 9?

Please select one item
Yes
Ticked No
Comments:
Bullet points one and two state the benefits that community growing can provide, such as improving biodiversity. While entirely possible, such benefits do result solely from community gardening. The approach employed to gardening is the crucial factor and it is important to highlight the fact that not all growing methodologies are the same. Environmentally sustainable approaches and practises are necessary in order to realise such benefits from community growing. We welcome that fact that bullet point eight mentions the importance of local environmental quality. Keep Scotland Beautiful has established the national benchmarking monitoring system Local Environmental Audit and Management System to measure the environmental quality of our communities. This is available to local authorities wishing to gather evidence. We believe that bullet point 14 should make stronger links with the Sustainable Development Goals as well as national food waste reduction targets.

22. Are there any gaps or omissions in paragraphs 10.1 to 10.6 of the FGS statutory guidance?

Please select one item
Ticked Yes
No
Comments:
With regard to carbon emissions reduction associated with food growing, the Climate Challenge Fund, which we manage and administer on behalf of the Scottish Government, has found through work with community food growing projects that educate on food waste and low carbon diets significantly increases the potential carbon savings for this activity.

24. Are there any gaps or omissions in paragraphs 11.1 to 11.15 of the FGS statutory guidance?

Please select one item
Ticked Yes
No
Comments:
Regarding point 11.15, existing, relevant frameworks such as Eco-Schools Scotland that have national remit and participation may support local authorities in engaging with schools. Through Keep Scotland Beautiful, there is the potential for Local Authorities to encourage such development, learn from current practise and help them meet the requirements in relation to part 9 of the CEA.

28. Are there any gaps or omissions in paragraphs 15.1 to 16.4 of the FGS statutory guidance?

Please select one item
Ticked Yes
No
Comments:
The Climate Challenge Fund (CCF) has funded community led organisations across all 32 Scottish Local Authorities since 2008. The CCF has supported 497 projects involving food which aim to reduce carbon emissions associated with food by encouraging the growing and consumption of local food. CCF projects also work to reduce food waste in their communities as well as encouraging composting of unavoidable food waste. This network of organisations includes: groups who have been previously funded and have continued to maintain these areas after funding; currently funded organisations who are currently developing these growing sites, and; groups currently applying to the fund who are in the development stages of this project. Across this network is a wealth of knowledge, experience and skills directly related to the process of developing and encouraging food growing on a local community scale. Through Keep Scotland Beautiful, there is the potential for Local Authorities to establish lines of communications with these groups to learn from their experiences and help them meet the requirements in relation to part 9 of the CEA. Keep Scotland Beautiful also provides support and recognition for community growing groups through the It’s Your Neighbourhood and Beautiful Scotland campaigns.

About you

What is your name?

Name
Catherine Gee

Are you responding as an individual or an organisation?

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(Required)
Individual
Ticked Organisation

What is your organisation?

Organisation
Keep Scotland Beautiful