Response 774020377

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Scottish Government Equality
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Victoria Quay, Edinburgh
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EH6 6QQ
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Community organisation
Third sector / equality organisation
Private sector organisation
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Local government
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Academic or Research Institute
Ticked Other – please state…
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Ticked Publish this response
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Topic: Basic demographics and household composition

1a. What do you, or have you used 2011 Census information about basic demographics and household composition for? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Ticked Resource allocation
Ticked Service planning and delivery
Ticked Targeting investment
Ticked Policy development and monitoring
Ticked Research requirement
Not used (go to Question 2)
Other purposes - please specify

1b. For what specific purpose do you, or have you used 2011 Census information basic demographics and household composition?

Sex
Census statistics broken down by sex (or gender) are used by equality analysts to detect and highlight gender inequality. These results are presented on the Equality Evidence Finder and in published statistical analysis equality reports. Policy makers use the analysis to promote gender equality and tackle gender inequality. Sex is a protected characteristic as set out in the Equality Act 2010. The Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties) (Scotland) Regulations 2012 require listed public authorities, including the Scottish Government, to set equality outcomes and report on progress on advancing equality, and good data is essential for that. Equality data is widely used by the Scottish Government and other public authorities to inform equality impact assessments (a legal requirement), which in turn inform policies and practices.
Age
Census statistics broken down by age are used by equality analysts to detect and highlight age inequality and age discrimination. These results are presented on the Equality Evidence Finder and in published statistical analysis reports. Policy makers use the analysis to promote equality and tackle age inequality. Information on Scotland’s aging population will help shape future services. Age is a protected characteristic as set out in the Equality Act 2010. The Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties) (Scotland) Regulations 2012 require listed public authorities, including the Scottish Government, to set equality outcomes and report on progress on advancing equality, and good data is essential for that. Equality data is widely used by the Scottish Government and other public authorities to inform equality impact assessments (a legal requirement), which in turn inform policies and practices.
Marital or same-sex civil partnership status
Being able to distinguish between mixed sex married couples and same sex married couples is important. Now that the Marriage and Civil Partnership (Scotland) Act 2014 is in force, this is a legally recognised relationship on which data should be collected in the Census. It is not enough for data on the number of people in same sex marriages to only be obtainable through NRS whilst data on the number of people in mixed sex marriages or civil partnerships can be found either from Census data or NRS. Including same sex marriage as a field in the Census will help raise awareness and increase acceptance of this relationship which could help promote equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. Furthermore, data on divorces can be broken down by gender which can indicate the number of same sex marriage divorces as opposed to mixed sex marriage divorces (for the purposes of claiming maintenance or support). It therefore seems logical that data on the number of same sex marriages should be collected via the Census. The review of civil partnership concluded on 15 December 2015. The options in the consultation were no change (so that civil partnership would remain open to same sex couples only); no more new civil partnerships from a date in the future; and the introduction of mixed sex civil partnership. The analysis of the consultation responses is not yet complete; however, it is worth bearing in mind that should mixed sex civil partnerships be recommended to Ministers or introduced, we would think it appropriate to include a field in the Census to collect data on mixed sex civil partnerships, similar to the arguments put forward for collecting data on same sex and mixed sex marriages separately. Marriage and Civil Partnership is a protected characteristic as set out in the Equality Act 2010. The Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties) (Scotland) Regulations 2012 require listed public authorities, including the Scottish Government, to set equality outcomes and report on progress on advancing equality, and good data is essential for that. Equality data is widely used by the Scottish Government and other public authorities to inform equality impact assessments (a legal requirement), which in turn inform policies and practices.

2a. At what geographical level do you, or have you used information about basic demographics and household composition? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Ticked Council area
Scottish Parliamentary Region
Scottish Parliamentary Constituency 2011
Westminster Parliamentary Constituency
Ticked Health Board Area
Community Health Care Partnership
Multi-member Council Ward
National Park
Postcode Sector
Settlement
Locality
Civil Parish
Inhabited Islands
Ticked SNS Data zone
Output Area
Ticked Scotland
Other - please specify.

3a. Is UK comparability a requirement for you/your work on basic demographics and household composition?

Please select one item
Yes, essential need
Ticked Yes, some need but not essential
No (Go to question 4)

3b. What type of comparisons are you making? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Ticked Comparisons at similar levels (for example, comparing Council Areas between countries)
Ticked Comparisons at different levels (for example, comparing Council Areas with the UK average).
Ticked Other – please specify
It 'other' please specify
Comparison between Scotland and other countries.

5. Do you, or have you analysed information about basic demographics and household composition in combination with any of the 2011 Census topics listed below? Select all that apply.

Please select one item
Ticked Yes (Please select all that apply from the list below)
No
Please select all that apply
Ticked Housing and accommodation
Ticked Basic demographics
Ticked Household composition
Ticked Migration
Travel to work
Travel to study
Ticked Ethnicity
Ticked Identity
Language
Ticked Religion
Health
Care
Ticked Educational attainment
Ticked Labour force and socio-economic classification

7a. Did the information collected in the 2011 Census about basic demographics and household composition meet your needs?

Please select one item
Fully
Partially
Ticked No

Topic: Migration

1a. What do you, or have you used 2011 Census information about migration for? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Resource allocation
Service planning and delivery
Targeting investment
Ticked Policy development and monitoring
Research requirement
Not used (go to Question 2)
Other purposes - please specify

1b. For what specific purpose do you, or have you used 2011 Census information on migration?

Country of birth
FGM – National Action Plan – to look at the number women whose country of birth is an FGM practising community gives some indicator of numbers of women potentially affected by FGM – and also we can look at numbers of girls born of mothers (and fathers) from FGM practising countries which gives some indicator, albeit loosely, of those who may be at risk.

2a. At what geographical level do you, or have you used information about migration? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Ticked Scotland
Ticked Council area
Scottish Parliamentary Region
Scottish Parliamentary Constituency 2011
Westminster Parliamentary Constituency
Health Board Area
Community Health Care Partnership
Multi-member Council Ward
National Park
Postcode Sector
Settlement
Locality
Civil Parish
Inhabited Islands
SNS Data zone
Output Area
Other - please specify.

3a. Is UK comparability a requirement for you/your work on migration?

Please select one item
Yes, essential need
Ticked Yes, some need but not essential
No (Go to question 4)

3b. What type of comparisons are you making? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Ticked Comparisons at similar levels (for example, comparing Council Areas between countries)
Ticked Comparisons at different levels (for example, comparing Council Areas with the UK average).
Other – please specify

4a. In 2021, is maintaining comparability with 2011 and/or earlier censuses for migration important for you/your work?

Please select one item
Ticked Yes
No (Go to Question 5)

4b. Please tell us why, making reference to the relevant sub-topic where possible.

If yes, please tell us why, making reference to the relevant sub-topic where possible.
To monitor progress against actions in FGM and race equality work.

7a. Did the information collected in the 2011 Census about migration meet your needs?

Please select one item
Fully
Partially
Ticked No

7b. Do you require any additional information about migration if it were to be included in the 2021 Census and why?

What additional information, if any, would you require about [insert topic name] if it were to be included in the 2021 Census and why?
It would not be appropriate to add in FGM in to the census and we recognise that we need to work more flexibly with statutory services and affected communities to look at ways to improve data collection.

Topic: Ethnicity and national identity

1a. What do you, or have you used 2011 Census information about ethnicity and national identity for? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Resource allocation
Service planning and delivery
Targeting investment
Ticked Policy development and monitoring
Ticked Research requirement
Not used (go to Question 2)
Other purposes - please specify

1b. For what specific purpose do you, or have you used 2011 Census information on ethnicity and national identity?

Ethnic group
Ethnic Group (Including Gypsy/Travellers) Developing interim evidence papers on race equality framework and themes of education, employment, health, housing, community cohesion and safety, and participation and representation. Providing advice to Cabinet Secretary for his appearance before the EOC Inquiry into race, ethnicity and employment – around labour market and ethnicity Census statistics broken down by ethnic group are used by equality analysts to promote equality and detect and highlight inequality. These results are presented on the Equality Evidence Finder and in published statistical analysis reports. The Scottish Government published a range of these reports following the release of the 2011 census data to show how Scotland’s ethnic groups fared across a range of policy areas. The new data on Gypsy/Travellers was particularly welcome and helped Scottish Government statisticians create an evidence base for this disadvantaged group. Census statistics have much more utility than those obtained from sample surveys and can be used at sub-national level. Race is a protected characteristic as set out in the Equality Act 2010. The Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties) (Scotland) Regulations 2012 require listed public authorities, including the Scottish Government, to set equality outcomes and report on progress on advancing equality, and good data is essential for that. Equality data is widely used by the Scottish Government and other public authorities to inform equality impact assessments (a legal requirement), which in turn inform policies and practices.
National identity
In relation to developing race equality framework, important to understand links between national identity and racial identity , and sense of belonging.

2a. At what geographical level do you, or have you used information about ethnicity and national identity? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Ticked Scotland
Ticked Council area
Scottish Parliamentary Region
Scottish Parliamentary Constituency 2011
Westminster Parliamentary Constituency
Ticked Health Board Area
Community Health Care Partnership
Multi-member Council Ward
National Park
Postcode Sector
Settlement
Locality
Civil Parish
Inhabited Islands
Ticked SNS Data zone
Output Area
Other - please specify.

3a. Is UK comparability a requirement for you/your work on ethnicity and national identity?

Please select one item
Ticked Yes, essential need
Yes, some need but not essential
No (Go to question 4)

4a. In 2021, is maintaining comparability with 2011 and/or earlier censuses for ethnicity and national identity important for you/your work?

Please select one item
Ticked Yes
No (Go to Question 5)

4b. Please tell us why, making reference to the relevant sub-topic where possible.

If yes, please tell us why, making reference to the relevant sub-topic where possible.
For baseline , for monitoring and evaluating actions from race equality framework

5. Do you, or have you analysed information about ethnicity and national identity in combination with any of the 2011 Census topics listed below? Select all that apply.

Please select one item
Ticked Yes
No
Please select all that apply
Ticked Housing and accommodation
Ticked Basic demographics
Ticked Household composition
Ticked Migration
Ticked Travel to work
Ticked Travel to study
Ethnicity
Identity
Ticked Language
Ticked Religion
Ticked Health
Ticked Care
Ticked Educational attainment
Ticked Labour force and socio-economic classification

Topic: Language

1a. What do you, or have you used 2011 Census information about language for? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Resource allocation
Service planning and delivery
Targeting investment
Ticked Policy development and monitoring
Research requirement
Not used (go to Question 2)
Other purposes - please specify

1b. For what specific purpose do you, or have you used 2011 Census information on language?

Other languages
BSL The 2011 Census for the first time provided national information on the use of British Sign Language (BSL) in Scotland. This provided evidence of need which was used in support of the new legislation to promote the use of understanding of BSL in Scotland (BSL (Scotland) Act 2015). The Scottish Government published a range of statistical reports following the release of the 2011 census data to show how Scotland’s BSL users fared across a range of policy areas.

2a. At what geographical level do you, or have you used information about language? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Ticked Scotland
Ticked Council area
Scottish Parliamentary Region
Scottish Parliamentary Constituency 2011
Westminster Parliamentary Constituency
Ticked Health Board Area
Community Health Care Partnership
Multi-member Council Ward
National Park
Postcode Sector
Settlement
Locality
Civil Parish
Inhabited Islands
SNS Data zone
Output Area
Other - please specify.

3a. Is UK comparability a requirement for you/your work on language?

Please select one item
Yes, essential need
Yes, some need but not essential
Ticked No (Go to question 4)

4a. In 2021, is maintaining comparability with 2011 and/or earlier censuses for language important for you/your work?

Please select one item
Ticked Yes
No (Go to Question 5)

4b. If yes, please tell us why, making reference to the relevant sub-topic where possible.

If yes, please tell us why, making reference to the relevant sub-topic where possible.
The purpose of the BSL (Scotland) Act is to promote and support British Sign Language. It will be important to have good data which can be tracked over time to establish the extent to which the language is used within Scottish households. At the local authority/health board level this will also provide useful information to help plan services for Deaf BSL users, and to reflect this in the BSL plans which are required under the legislation.

5. Have you analysed information about language in combination with any of the 2011 Census topics listed below? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Ticked Housing and accommodation
Ticked Basic demographics
Ticked Household composition
Migration
Travel to work
Travel to study
Ethnicity
Identity
Language
Religion
Ticked Health
Ticked Care
Educational attainment
Labour force and socio-economic classification

6a. Are you aware of alternative (non-census) sources of information about language?

Please select one item
Ticked No (Go to question 7)
Yes - please specify by sub topic.

7a. Did the information collected in the 2011 Census about language meet your needs?

Please select one item
Fully
Ticked Partially
No

7b. Do you require any additional information about language if it were to be included in the 2021 Census and why?

Please select one item
Ticked Yes
No - please provide details of the additional information you require.
What additional information, if any, would you require about [insert topic name] if it were to be included in the 2021 Census and why?
The current question asks about use of BSL in the home. It does not establish whether this is the first or preferred language of one or more individuals in the home. Therefore the figure includes not only Deaf BSL users but also hearing family members who use BSL to communicate within the home, and other hearing people such as BSL interpreters. It would be useful to ascertain how many of the households where BSL is used include one or more Deaf people. If it were possible to establish how many Deaf BSL users live in each household this would provide very useful information. At present, I don’t think this information can be derived from the data collected.

Topic: Religion

1a. What do you, or have you used 2011 Census information about religion for? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Resource allocation
Service planning and delivery
Targeting investment
Ticked Policy development and monitoring
Research requirement
Not used (go to Question 2)
Other purposes - please specify

1b. For what specific purpose do you, or have you used 2011 Census information on religion ?

Religion
Census statistics broken down by religion are used by equality analysts to promote equality and detect and highlight inequality. These results are presented on the Equality Evidence Finder and in published statistical analysis reports. The Scottish Government published a range of these reports following the release of the 2011 census data to show how Scotland’s religious groups fared across a range of policy areas. Census statistics have much more utility than those obtained from sample surveys and can be used at sub-national level. Religion is a protected characteristic as set out in the Equality Act 2010. The Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties) (Scotland) Regulations 2012 require listed public authorities, including the Scottish Government, to set equality outcomes and report on progress on advancing equality, and good data is essential for that. Equality data is widely used by the Scottish Government and other public authorities to inform equality impact assessments (a legal requirement), which in turn inform policies and practices.

2a. At what geographical level do you, or have you used information about religion? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Ticked Scotland
Ticked Council area
Scottish Parliamentary Region
Scottish Parliamentary Constituency 2011
Westminster Parliamentary Constituency
Health Board Area
Community Health Care Partnership
Multi-member Council Ward
National Park
Postcode Sector
Settlement
Locality
Civil Parish
Inhabited Islands
Ticked SNS Data zone
Output Area
Other - please specify.

4a. In 2021, is maintaining comparability with 2011 and/or earlier censuses for religion important for you/your work?

Please select one item
Ticked Yes
No (Go to Question 5)

4b. Please tell us why, making reference to the relevant sub-topic where possible.

If yes, please tell us why, making reference to the relevant sub-topic where possible.
Important to show change over time on a consistent basis.

5. Do you, or have you analysed information about religion in combination with any of the 2011 Census topics listed below?

Please select one item
Ticked Yes (Please select all that apply from the list below)
No
Please select all that apply
Ticked Housing and accommodation
Ticked Basic demographics
Ticked Household composition
Ticked Migration
Ticked Travel to work
Ticked Travel to study
Ticked Ethnicity
Ticked Identity
Ticked Language
Religion
Ticked Health
Care
Ticked Educational attainment
Ticked Labour force and socio-economic classification

Topic: Health and care

1a. What do you, or have you used 2011 Census information about health and care for? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Resource allocation
Service planning and delivery
Targeting investment
Ticked Policy development and monitoring
Research requirement
Not used (go to Question 2)
Other purposes - please specify

1b. For what specific purpose do you, or have you used 2011 Census information on health and care?

Long-term health problem or disability
Census statistics broken down by disability are used by equality analysts detect and highlight inequality. These results are presented on the Equality Evidence Finder and in published statistical analysis reports. The Scottish Government published a range of these reports following the release of the 2011 census data to show how people with a disability fared across a range of policy areas. An age-standardised analysis showed which ethnic groups were most likely to have a long term condition. Census statistics have much more utility than those obtained from sample surveys and can be used at sub-national level. Disability is a protected characteristic as set out in the Equality Act 2010. The Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties) (Scotland) Regulations 2012 require listed public authorities, including the Scottish Government, to set equality outcomes and report on progress on advancing equality, and good data is essential for that. Equality data is widely used by the Scottish Government and other public authorities to inform equality impact assessments (a legal requirement), which in turn inform policies and practices.

2a. At what geographical level do you, or have you used information about health and care? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Ticked Scotland
Ticked Council area
Scottish Parliamentary Region
Scottish Parliamentary Constituency 2011
Westminster Parliamentary Constituency
Ticked Health Board Area
Ticked Community Health Care Partnership
Multi-member Council Ward
National Park
Postcode Sector
Settlement
Locality
Civil Parish
Inhabited Islands
Ticked SNS Data zone
Output Area
Other - please specify.

5. Do you, or have you analysed information about health and care in combination with any of the 2011 Census topics listed below? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Ticked Housing and accommodation
Ticked Basic demographics
Ticked Household composition
Ticked Migration
Ticked Travel to work
Ticked Travel to study
Ticked Ethnicity
Ticked Identity
Ticked Language
Ticked Religion
Health
Care
Ticked Educational attainment
Ticked Labour force and socio-economic classification

New topic: Sexual orientation

1a. For what purpose do you require information about sexual orientation? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Resource allocation
Ticked Service planning and delivery
Ticked Targeting investment
Ticked Policy development and monitoring
Ticked Research requirement
Not used (Go to Question 2)
Other purpose – please specify

1b. Please provide details about your purpose (s)

Please provide details about your purpose (s)
The percentage of the population whose sexual orientation is not heterosexual is unknown as this information is not formally collected through official routes. Estimates are that lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) people make up around 5-7% of the population, although this is widely understood to be a conservative figure. Recent national surveys carried out between 2005 and 2010 (Measuring Sexual Identity from the Integrated Household Survey (2009-2010)) have found that between 1.1% and 2.4% of the population self-identified as LGB in the UK. It is likely that these figures under report the size of the LGB population in Scotland. The extent of the variation in the estimated LGB population supports the inclusion of a question on this topic in the Census. Furthermore, figures from GROS for the second quarter of 2014 show that there were 8,342 marriages, and 129 civil partnerships (54 male and 75 female). This is 1.5% of civil partnerships in relation to the number of marriages in Scotland which would be indicative of conservative estimates of the LGB population in Scotland. At the end of 2014, there were 5,401 civil partnerships registered in Scotland, and it is anticipated that approximately half of these would change to a same sex marriage. In the first year of the Marriage and Civil Partnership (Scotland) Act 2014, quarter 3 statistics from NRS show around 2,000 same sex couples have married in Scotland, either by changing their existing civil partnerships to a marriage (573) or a same sex couple marrying for the first time (1,137). Sexual Orientation is a protected characteristic as set out in the Equality Act 2010. The Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties) (Scotland) Regulations 2012 require listed public authorities, including the Scottish Government, to set equality outcomes and report on progress on advancing equality, and good data is essential for that. Equality data is widely used by the Scottish Government and other public authorities to inform equality impact assessments (a legal requirement), which in turn inform policies and practices.

2a. At what geographical level do you require information about sexual orientation? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Ticked Scotland
Ticked Council area
Scottish Parliamentary Region
Scottish Parliamentary Constituency 2011
Westminster Parliamentary Constituency
Ticked Health Board Area
Community Health Care Partnership
Multi-member Council Ward
National Park
Postcode Sector
Settlement
Locality
Civil Parish
Inhabited Islands
Ticked SNS Data zone
Output Area
Other – please specify

2b. If you need information about sexual orientation for population sub-groups, please describe:

If you need information about sexual orientation for population sub-groups, please describe:
This information would be useful to establish the level of attainment of LGB people in local authorities; the level of deprivation LGB people experience; and LGB-specific health services that are appropriate to the LGB population in that health board area.

3a. Is UK comparability a requirement for you/your work on about sexual orientation?

Please select one item
Yes, essential need
Ticked Yes, some need but not essential
No (Go to Question 4)

3b. What type of comparisons would you require to make? (select all that apply)

Please select all that apply
Ticked Comparisons at similar levels (for example, comparing Council Areas between countries)
Ticked Comparisons at different levels (for example, comparing Council Areas with the UK average).
Ticked Other – please specify
What type of comparisons would you require to make?
Comparison between Scotland and other countries.

4. Would you analyse information about sexual orientation in combination with any of the 2011 Census topics listed below?

Please select one item
Ticked Yes (please select all that apply from the list below)
No
Please select all that apply
Ticked Housing and accommodation
Ticked Basic demographics
Ticked Household composition
Ticked Migration
Travel to work
Travel to study
Ticked Ethnicity
Ticked Identity
Language
Ticked Religion
Ticked Health
Ticked Care
Ticked Educational attainment
Ticked Labour force and socio-economic classification

5a. Are you aware of alternative (non-census) sources of information about sexual orientation?

Please select one item
No (Go to Question 6)
Ticked Yes - please specify.
Are you aware of alternative (non-census) sources of information about sexual orientation?
Scottish Household Survey Scottish Health Survey Crime and Justice Survey Integrated Health Survey Scottish Social Attitudes Survey – Discrimination module. This has demonstrated the positive change in attitudes towards, for example, same sex married couples. Informal data collection by LGBT-specific organisations

5b. Do the alternative source(s) meet your current requirements?

Please select one item
Yes
Ticked No - please provide details of why the alternative source does not meet your requirements.
please provide details of why the alternative source does not meet your requirements.
Although there is a figure for the estimated LGB population of Scotland, this figure is widely debated and is therefore not robust. Although the greatest proportion of LGB people are understood to live in large urban areas, this national figure is also not much use for sub-national purposes. Furthermore, as confidence levels are wide, the margin for error is greater. Before the Marriage and Civil Partnership (Scotland) Act 2014 was introduced, the Scottish Government conducted two consultations: one on the possible introduction of same sex marriage and another on the draft bill. The number of LGB people in Scotland is not directly relevant to the introduction of this legislation: the Act was introduced because the Scottish Government believes in equality and that it was the right thing to do to providing marriage for same sex couples in the same way that mixed sex couples can. However, a more robust estimation of the LGB population of Scotland would have helped develop the anticipated costs of this legislation and helped with forward planning for registrars across Scotland by forecasting potential demand. • Figures from GROS for the second quarter of 2014 show that there were 8,342 marriages, and 129 civil partnerships (54 male and 75 female). This is 1.5% of civil partnerships in relation to the number of marriages in Scotland. Likewise, a better understanding of this demographic could have helped inform the consultation of the review of civil partnership in Scotland. Whilst we know the number of civil partnerships in Scotland, we do not know the number of LGB people who could form a civil partnership. This would have been useful to make comparisons with the heterosexual population and to estimate the likely uptake of civil partnership by mixed sex couples, the potential cost of doing so, and the additional work this would create for registrars, etc.

6. Please use the space provided below for any other comments you want to make, relevant to sexual orientation.

Please use the space provided below for any other comments you want to make, relevant to sexual orientation.
Collecting Census data on this topic would help identify where the most concentrated groups of LGB people live to help better develop and target service provision, particularly health services where there is a specific LGB need. However, this data would also be useful to identify the population across remote and rural areas where there is a greater incidence of isolation and where a different approach to service delivery is necessary. Homophobia and biphobia is an issue in modern day Scotland. Including a question on sexual orientation in the Census will help raise awareness and put this issue on people’s radars, contributing to reducing the stigma of LGB people. It will also have implications for the progression of LGB equality in Scotland by increasing the visibility of these communities, allowing services and support to be better targeted to better meet their needs.

New sub-topic: Citizenship

1a. For what purpose do you require information about citizenship? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Resource allocation
Ticked Service planning and delivery
Ticked Targeting investment
Ticked Policy development and monitoring
Ticked Research requirement
Not used (Go to Question 2)
Other purpose – please specify

1b. Please provide details about your purpose (s)

Please provide details about your purpose (s)
People have different rights depending on citizenship. This would provide with an additional lens to inform race equality work, in addition to ethnic group and national identity categories. This is a very relevant issue in view of a possibility of UK leaving the EU and high numbers of EU migrants in Scotland.

New sub-topic: Voluntary and unpaid work

1a. For what purpose do you require information about voluntary and unpaid work? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Resource allocation
Ticked Service planning and delivery
Ticked Targeting investment
Ticked Policy development and monitoring
Ticked Research requirement
Not used (Go to Question 2)
Other purpose – please specify

1b. Please provide details about your purpose (s)

Please provide details about your purpose (s)
Relevant for all of the protected characteristics. Voluntary/unpaid work is both a positive (enhancing skills and social capital, for example) and a negative (when taken up because paid work is unavailable) indicator of equality.

Additional topic suggestion 1

Topic

Enter your suggested topic:
Gender Identity

1a. For what purpose do you require information about this topic? Select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Resource allocation
Ticked Service planning and delivery
Ticked Targeting investment
Ticked Policy development and monitoring
Ticked Research requirement
Not used (Go to Question 2)
Other purposes – please specify

1b. Please provide details about your purpose (s).

Please provide details about your purpose (s).
In their Home Office funded study in 2009, GIRES estimated the number of trans people in the UK to be between 300,000-500,000. The estimated transgender population of Scotland is approximately 10% of that of the T population of the UK (30,000-50,000). The Scottish Transgender Alliance (STA) has more recently suggested that this figure is closer to 10,000-20,000. In the first decade following the implementation of the Gender Recognition Act 2004, NRS issued over 250 revised birth certificates following gender recognition. In the UK, the number of people aged over 15 presenting for treatment for gender dysphoria is thought to be 3 in 100,000 (that is 1,500 per annum presenting for treatment for gender dysphoria). However, in developing a new Gender Reassignment Services (GRS) Protocol in 2012, NHS Health Scotland and its partners completed a scoping exercise which estimated the number of people presenting for treatment for gender dysphoria to be slightly higher, at around 200 per annum. Trans people have very specific health needs. Having a more comprehensive understanding of the number of trans people and where they live will help to better develop trans inclusive services providing appropriate care and support. The GRS Protocol provides a consistent treatment pathway for procedures exclusive to gender reassignment which should take place 18 weeks after referral, however, these targets for trans patients are often not met due to the shortage of Gender Identity Clinics and gender identity specialists in Scotland. Including a question in the Census to help establish the actual number of trans people in Scotland and where they live would assist in providing more trans specific services in the areas with the most concentrated trans population. Gender reassignment is a protected characteristic as set out in the Equality Act 2010. The Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties) (Scotland) Regulations 2012 require listed public authorities, including the Scottish Government, to set equality outcomes and report on progress on advancing equality, and good data is essential for that. Equality data is widely used by the Scottish Government and other public authorities to inform equality impact assessments (a legal requirement), which in turn inform policies and practices.

2a. At what geographical level do you require information about this topic? Please select all that apply.

Please select all that apply
Ticked Scotland
Ticked Council area
Scottish Parliamentary Region
Scottish Parliamentary Constituency 2011
Westminster Parliamentary Constituency
Ticked Health Board Area
Community Health Care Partnership
Multi-member Council Ward
National Park
Postcode Sector
Settlement
Locality
Civil Parish
Inhabited Islands
Ticked SNS Data zone
Output Area
Ticked Other – please specify

2b. If you need information about this topic for population sub-groups, please describe:

If you need information about sexual orientation for population sub-groups, please describe:
This information would be useful to establish the level of attainment of trans people in local authorities; the level of deprivation trans people experience; and trans-specific health services that are appropriate to the population in that health board area.

3a. Is UK comparability a requirement for you/your work on about this topic?

Please select one item
Yes, essential need
Ticked Yes, some need but not essential
No (Go to Question 4)

3b. What type of comparisons you would require to make? (select all that apply)

Please select all that apply
Ticked Comparisons at similar levels (for example, comparing Council Areas between countries)
Ticked Comparisons at different levels (for example, comparing Council Areas with the UK average).
Ticked Other – please specify
Please specify if other
Comparison between Scotland and other countries.

4. Would you analyse information about this topic in combination with any of the 2011 Census topics listed below?

Please select one item
Ticked Yes (Please select all that apply from the list below)
No
Please select all that apply
Ticked Housing and accommodation
Ticked Basic demographics
Ticked Household composition
Ticked Migration
Travel to work
Travel to study
Ticked Ethnicity
Ticked Identity
Language
Ticked Religion
Ticked Health
Ticked Care
Ticked Educational attainment
Ticked Labour force and socio-economic classification

5a. Are you aware of alternative (non-census) sources of information about this topic?

Please select one item
No (Go to Question 6)
Ticked Yes – please specify.

5b. Do the alternative source(s) meet your current requirements?

Please select one item
Yes
Ticked No - please provide details of why the alternative source does not meet your requirements
If no, please specify
Answers to 5a Scottish Household Survey Scottish Health Survey Crime and Justice Survey Integrated Health Survey Scottish Social Attitudes Survey – Discrimination module. This has demonstrated the positive change in attitudes towards transgender people. Informal data collection by trans-specific organisations Answer to 5b Although there is a figure for the estimated trans population of Scotland, this figure is widely debated and is therefore not robust. Although the greatest proportion of trans people are understood to live in large urban areas, this national figure is also not much use for sub-national purposes. Furthermore, as confidence levels are wide, the margin for error is greater. On 1 November 2013, Germany became Europe's first country to legally recognise a third gender. In Germany, parents of intersex babies – those born with characteristics of both sexes/indeterminate genitalia – can register their child as neither male nor female by not selecting a gender on the child’s birth certificate. Other countries have also taken steps towards the recognition of a third gender: • Australians have had the option of selecting "x" as their gender - meaning indeterminate, unspecified or intersex - on passport applications since 2011. A similar option was introduced for New Zealanders in 2012. • In South Asia, Bangladesh has offered an "other" gender category on passport applications since 2011. • Nepal began recognising a third gender on its census forms in 2007 while Pakistan made it an option on national identity cards in 2011. • India added a third gender category to voter lists in 2009. • Transgender or intersex people have long been accepted in Thailand and are officially recognised by the country's military, although they do not have any separate legal status. In summer 2014, the STA launched the Equal Recognition Campaign: http://www.scottishtrans.org/equal/. This calls for the Scottish Government to change the laws concerning trans and intersex people in three ways which the STA believes will assist in progressing equality for trans and intersex equality and human rights issues. The campaign asks are: 1. Remove the offensive psychiatric assessment requirement from legal gender recognition 2. Introduce legal recognition for people who do not identify as male or female 3. Reduce the age at which trans and intersex people can change their birth certificates. The second ask refers to the introduction of a third gender for those with non-binary gender identities. The STA has pointed out that with the free movement between EU countries, it is very possible that someone from a country with third gender recognition could move to Scotland, but that the current Census would not allow for their legal gender to be captured. Scottish Government funding of £45,000 was granted to Equality Network/STA in 2015-16 facilitate engagement between intersex people and relevant organisations to develop an understanding of intersex equality, rights and inclusion in Scotland. The long-term aim of this investment is to support the development of intersex equality policy to help protect intersex children from unnecessary genital surgeries and enable intersex people to easily obtain legal recognition of their self-determined gender. This work is likely to progress much further over the next five years, therefore there is likely be a greater need for the 2021 Census to appropriately capture this information.

6. Please use the space provided below for any other comments you want to make, relevant to this topic.

Please use the space provided below for any other comments you want to make, relevant to [insert topic name].
Including the topic of gender identity in the Census questionnaire could be achieved by adding “Other” as a field alongside the “Male” and “Female” options to the “Sex” question as well as additional questions alongside other protected characteristic questions. Doing so upfront at the start of the survey would raise awareness of trans and intersex issues more generally, helping to mainstream this issue which some have difficulty engaging with. It would also increase visibility of those whose gender identity is not male or female, and increase acceptance of those who have non-binary gender identities. For trans and intersex people, by being responsive to issues particular to these communities, the Census would be more inclusive and progressive, and would contribute to addressing transphobia in Scotland. Collecting Census data on this topic would help identify where the most concentrated groups of trans people live to help better develop and target service provision, particularly health services where there is a specific trans need. However, this data would also be useful to identify the population across remote and rural areas where there is a greater incidence of isolation and where a different approach to service delivery is necessary.