Response 823322087

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Meg Wright

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Engineering Development Trust

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Questions

1. Do you agree with the definition provided of STEM for the purposes of this Strategy?

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Do you agree with the definition provided of STEM for the purposes of this Strategy?
On the whole the definition seems to be fit for purpose. However, perhaps the Science statement could have more about exploration, discovery and investigation

2. Do you think the aims of this Strategy and the four priority themes are the right ones to address the challenges identified?

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Do you think the aims of this Strategy and the four priority themes are the right ones to address the challenges identified?
The aims of the strategy are clear and improving enthusiasm is key in raising attainment and aspirations. The priorities are spot on! Matching education and training to industry is vital to ensure economic growth and success.

3. Are these success criteria right?

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No
If not, tell us what criteria we should use instead.
The outcomes are rightly ambitious. However, it is important to have cross generational opportunities for families to learn together is needed to ensure the outcomes are met. I think there needs to be some work around adult STEM literacy and numeracy to sit alongside the outcomes.

4. Do you think the scope of the Strategy is right? Tell us if you think it should exclude something or include anything else. For example, should it include training and development that employers provide for their workforce?

Do you think the scope of the Strategy is right? Tell us if you think it should exclude something or include anything else. For example, should it include training and development that employers provide for their workforce?
Whilst it is essential to have an emphasis on early years, the building blocks need to be there. Early years’ strategy needs clear links and pathways with secondary intervention planning as a pathway not a random bolt on implementation. Teachers will need to see the continuity clearly across the learning community. There is a lack of STEM confidence amongst teachers and this needs tackling urgently. STEM specialist teachers for nursery and primary schools may be a starting point in raising STEM attainment in teachers. There also needs to be a framework of ongoing employer engagement at early years and continuing through the whole of school life. Employers/Industry needs support in delivering worthwhile engagement is schools. Often we see employers wanting to help and not sure where to begin. A comprehensive suite of quality options for employers and schools to choose from, engaging with voluntary sector organisations, would be a good starting point. Whilst the occasional talk from industry to a class of pupils can be engaging, longer term projects with deeper engagement is needed.

5. Give us your views on whether you think the actions already underway across the sectors on STEM fit well with the Strategy and will contribute positively to it.

Give us your views on whether you think the actions already underway across the sectors on STEM fit well with the Strategy and will contribute positively to it.
Work based learning is essential for success. This should be seen in a broad context with employer engagement at the centre and opportunities for young person to experience multiple engagements throughout their school years with age-appropriate information and engagement. However, Mentor Training and School Engagement training is essential. EDT provides employer with Mentor qualifications which ensures legacy and impetus for further engagement. We cannot expect employer engagement in schools without support and training – a qualification will go a long way at enthusing employers/staff to contribute to engaging with schools and young people.

6. Tell us about activity currently ongoing – either included in this document or not – that you think could be adapted or stopped and why.

Tell us about activity currently ongoing – either included in this document or not – that you think could be adapted or stopped and why.
Industrial Cadet accreditation framework fits well and can be scaled up across Scotland. The framework, which is industry- led, ensures quality engagement and provides young people with an award for completing stages across STEM activity. The framework lends itself to improving STEM knowledge as well and employment skills

7. Do you agree with the principles set out for implementation?

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No

8. What else should Government do to ensure a more coherent approach and maximise impact?

What else should Government do to ensure a more coherent approach and maximise impact?
Measuring impact and quality is essential. There is a need to try new approaches and thought and funding should be given towards innovation and trying out new methods of improving STEM uptake and attainment. Lessons can be learned and good practice shared

9. Overall, do you think this Strategy is clear and action focused? Do you think that the actions that we propose to take nationally will achieve the aims and intended outcomes?

Overall, do you think this Strategy is clear and action focused? Do you think that the actions that we propose to take nationally will achieve the aims and intended outcomes?
Yes

10. Will this Strategy improve equity of outcomes? If not, tell us what else it should include, in particular for women and girls and other groups of people – disabled people, care leavers and minority ethnic communities.

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No
Will this Strategy improve equity of outcomes? If not, tell us what else it should include, in particular for women and girls and other groups of people – disabled people, care leavers and minority ethnic communities.
This strategy should improve equity if there is continuity of effort from early years onwards. With consistently applied opportunities across ALL sectors, young people will make informed choices and gender balance should even out. Tackling teacher STEM training will go a long way to help with gender balance. The majority of primary teachers are female and therefore have a great influence on girls – if girls do not get high quality STEM education at early years from their female teacher then gender imbalance will continue.

11. What could schools, colleges, universities, community learning and development, the voluntary sector, science engagement providers and museums do to support the areas for action?

What could schools, colleges, universities, community learning and development, the voluntary sector, science engagement providers and museums do to support the areas for action?
Ensuring the STEM landscape is not overcrowded with poor quality engagement. All engagement, whether from third sector or industry should conform to set standard. There are too many ad hoc engagements in schools that have no quality framework

12. What could professional organisations and bodies and third sector organisations do to support the areas for action? This includes, in particular, the General Teaching Council for Scotland, the CLD Standards Council, the teaching unions and representatives and the Learned Societies.

What could professional organisations and bodies and third sector organisations do to support the areas for action? This includes, in particular, the General Teaching Council for Scotland, the CLD Standards Council, the teaching unions and representatives and the Learned Societies
More explicit action for quality employer engagement and to ensure all young people gets a minimum number of opportunities to engage with employers throughout school life. Research demonstrates that multiple employer engagements can prevent young people becoming NEET. Work based learning and work experience needs to be re-defined and action should be to ensure a framework for all young people to have access. Space and time in the school day needs to be made to enable these engagements to take place.

14. Should this Strategy identify more actions for particular sectors, for example in relation to workplace and work-based training and development? Please make suggestions on what these actions could be.

Should this Strategy identify more actions for particular sectors, for example in relation to workplace and work-based training and development? Please make suggestions on what these actions could be.
More explicit action for quality employer engagement and to ensure all young people gets a minimum number of opportunities to engage with employers throughout school life. Research demonstrates that multiple employer engagements can prevent young people becoming NEET. Work based learning and work experience needs to be re-defined and action should be to ensure a framework for all young people to have access. Space and time in the school day needs to be made to enable these engagements to take place.

15. Tell us what you think about this Improvement Framework. How can we best ensure uptake of this Framework in early years learning settings, schools and clusters?

Tell us what you think about this Improvement Framework. How can we best ensure uptake of this Framework in early years learning settings, schools and clusters?
Leadership and teacher confidence is absolutely essential. STEM leads in each local authority and school cluster will go some way towards implementing the strategy, but this should be a full time role, not an add-on to the day job. The implementation starts with student teacher training and CPD for existing teachers. We see too much 'chalk and talk' in schools and there is are many more imaginative ways of teaching which will encourage and inspire pupils. A clear delivery plan is needed with timeframes and feedback loops. It is also not a quick fix - this needs to be a 10year + plan with the investment to go along with it.

16. Tell us what you think of our proposal for developing a model of collaboration between schools, colleges, universities and employers. How should we now take this forward?

Tell us what you think of our proposal for developing a model of collaboration between schools, colleges, universities and employers. How should we now take this forward?
Collaboration is key with implementation and success driven by the scale and structure of collaboration. The third sector is missing from the question and the sector provides many excellent examples of STEM education and training and the ability to work across all education structures and engage with employers.

17. Tell us what you think of our proposals for a Scottish STEM ambassador network. How should we now take that forward?

Tell us what you think of our proposals for a Scottish STEM ambassador network. How should we now take that forward?
The current STEM ambassador programme in Scotland is useful and in my view working well. There is no need for a new network –work in collaboration with the existing network to improve induction, training and participation.

18. What other groups, organisations or people need to be involved in delivery of this strategy?

What other groups, organisations or people need to be involved in delivery of this strategy?
It is essential there is a commitment from employers and an acceptance that an intermediary is often required between education and industry. Teachers are often having to juggle with their ‘day job’ and organising employer engagements. Third sector organisations are well placed to provide the structure, framework, programmes and partnerships to ensure success. EDT and similar third sector organisations need to be round the table as they have an important role in actually making this strategy happen and be successful

19. Tell us about what you are doing in your organisation, establishment or community that supports the aims and priorities of this Strategy.

Tell us about what you are doing in your organisation, establishment or community that supports the aims and priorities of this Strategy.
The Engineering Development Trust (EDT) provides a range of programmes aimed at improving the life chances of young people as they transition through school into the world of work. Our STEM enrichment activities includes hands-on practical experiences of real work scenarios, linking educators and industry and providing an amazing opportunities to enhance the technical, personal and employability skills of young people. Our Industrial Cadet quality assurance framework ensures that young people gain an industry recognised award and vital skills and employers provide a quality experience. www.industrialcadets.org.uk Our work can be categorised into Tasters, Programmes and Placements. TASTERS First Edition – Hands-on STEM activity days Open Industry – Curriculum focused in-company educational experiences Routes into STEM – a three day course aimed at both teachers and students demonstrating the pathways into STEM by spending a day in college, industry and university PROGRAMMES PreSTEM – a 4-6 week project aimed at upper primary school on the themes of health, environment and sustainability Go4SET – a 10 week project aimed at 12-14 year olds. Projects are varied but are all STEM related Engineering Education Scheme – Real life 6 month STEM projects for 16-17 year old students. PLACEMENTS Year in Industry - Paid career development work placements for students completing Highers or as part of a university sandwich year. By offering a continuum we aim to reach out to pupils of all abilities, raise aspirations, challenge the myths that surround STEM and increase diversity in pupils choosing STEM. We develop longer term relationships with schools and employers which will help to: • support the successful transitions Primary to Secondary Broad general education to senior phase Senior school to a positive destination • ensure equal opportunity and a level playing field, • raise STEM attainment • develop essential employability skills • equip young people with the tools needed to progress from school to further/higher education or employment • provide sustainability and longevity Further information Routes into STEM offers teachers the opportunity to contrast and compare undergraduate and apprentice pathways to STEM study and careers. The programme will give teachers the knowledge and understanding of the pathways into STEM beyond school. EDT works in partnership with a college, university and a company to deliver Routes into STEM 3 day programme for teachers to provide with information and knowledge which can then be shared with pupils. The course is highly interactive and hands-on. Routes into STEM teachers with increased knowledge and awareness and help them fulfil their obligations set out in the Career Education Standards First Edition: • Enhances the curriculum, providing an interactive learning experience through stimulating hands-on activities • Provides students with information about STEM careers and study routes • Engages and inspires students to shape their own future choices • Assists the development of skills, by encouraging teamwork, creativity, problem solving, time management, and innovation – vital for our future workforce. First Edition event caters for up to 120 students working in small teams. A typical day includes an ice-breaker activity to encourage teamwork and communication, 2-3 engaging and stimulating practical “design, build and test” challenges and a careers guidance presentation from STEM industry/ university ambassadors exposing the students to the wide range of technical careers available to them. Open Industry Companies open their doors to class groups of students and provide a meaningful insight into the company and the career possibilities available. Like First Edition the aims are to enhance the curriculum, provide information about careers and inspire students to think about careers that they may never have considered. Open Industry offers employers the opportunity to showcase their company and demonstrate the world of work. PreSTEM • Enhances the curriculum, providing an interactive learning experience through stimulating project work and hands-on activities • Provides outcomes in literacy, numeracy, science, technology and co-operative learning • Provides pupils with information about STEM careers • Assists the development of skills, by encouraging teamwork, creativity, problem solving, time management, and innovation – vital for our future workforce. Working with whole year/class groups of P7 pupils, the programme is designed to level the playing field in raising attainment in literacy, numeracy and STEM; particularly for under-represented pupils. We engage with pupil of all abilities, including those with additional support needs, and in areas where there is a high percentage of low income and disadvantage. Each PreSTEM programme caters for year groups where they will spend four- six weeks working in small teams on an Eco- Project such as Energy in Your School, Inspiring Learning Spaces, Healthy Classroom. The year groups are supported through their project by trained S6 student mentors. A typical programme includes: • S6 mentor training and teacher briefing • Launch day to introduce the project to the pupils and provide activities to encourage teamwork and communication • 4-6 weeks project work where the pupils will research their topic, develop ideas, prepare a poster and create a model and prepare a presentation, supported by their S6 student mentor • A visit from an industry STEM ambassador • A celebration and assessment day when the teams of pupil will present their ideas and model to a panel of industry assessors. The pupil will also take part in a science quiz and STEM activity Outcomes of PreSTEM : • Pupils perception of STEM subjects will improve • Pupils confidence in studying STEM subjects will be higher • Pupils develop their skills in teamwork, problem solving, creativity, communication, time management and working under pressure • S6 Mentors will gain vital skills and a recognised mentoring qualification Go4SET is a work-related learning scheme, designed to increase pupil’s capability in STEM. The pupils, in teams of six, work through a project learning about technical aspects, research, team work, project management, report writing, presentations skills and develop career awareness. An industry mentor is on hand to assist, guide and provide advice. The range of project choices includes Finance and Technology, Electronics, Environment, Climate and Recycling. Go4SET: • Enhances the curriculum, providing an interactive learning experience through stimulating project work and hands-on activities • Provides outcomes in literacy, numeracy, science, technology and co-operative learning • Provides pupils with information about STEM careers • Assists the development of life skills, by encouraging teamwork, creativity, problem solving, time management, and innovation – vital for our future workforce. We engage with pupil of all abilities, including those with additional support needs, and in areas where there is a high percentage of low income and disadvantage. A typical programme includes: • Industry mentor training and teacher briefing • Launch day to introduce the project to the pupils and provide activities to encourage teamwork and communication • 10 weeks project work where the pupils will research their topic, develop ideas, prepare a visual display, create a model and prepare a presentation, supported by their industry mentor • A visit to a company to place learning in a real-life context • A celebration and assessment day when the teams of pupil will present their ideas and model to a panel of industry assessors. Pupil Quotes “Taking responsibility for our own learning was a massive part of this project and after a slow start we all stepped up to the plate to contribute. We would like to thank everyone who has given us the opportunity to be involved in such a great project.” “Our mentor was a great help, but he didn’t just give us the answers: he pointed us in the right direction and gave us the tools to work it out for ourselves,” Outcomes of Go4SET: • Pupils perception of STEM subjects will improve • Pupils confidence in studying STEM subjects will be higher • Pupils develop their skills in teamwork, problem solving, creativity, communication, time management and working under pressure - all vital for successful transition into employment • Industrial Cadet (IC) award at Bronze level. The Industrial Cadets award structure is based on a skills and competencies framework www.industrialcadets.org.uk. Benefits to industry include: • Showcases STEM careers and career pathways • Ability to influence pupils, teachers and parents • Addresses pre-conceptions of careers • Opportunity to develop staff through mentoring and leadership skills, contributing towards continued professional development • Corporate Social Responsibility and Community Benefits objectives • Develop relationship with the schools and closing the skills gaps • Reaching out in harder to recruit areas Mentor quote “The Go4Set scheme has been a great way for our company to interact with local school students and increase their understanding of real world applications of science and technology Thank you for the opportunity” The Engineering Education Scheme (EES) - project-based scheme that sees six 17 year old students work as consultants on a real-life engineering, technology or science based project set and managed by a supporting company. Industry mentors work closely with the team to provide guidance, support and access to the company’s technology. EES is delivered through launch and celebration events, as well as a two-day residential university workshop that enables the teams to use university facilities to derive practical solutions to the company problem they are working on. EES aims to • encourage young people to develop employability skills • provide real-world understanding of industry through practical hands-on experience increase technical knowledge and practical skills that are vital for a successful transition into employment. Students: • Enjoy visiting a company where the challenge really takes shape. • Engage with workshops at a university for practical hands-on application of various engineering based skills working with technology not available in school • Engage with experience mentors throughout the project Student Quotes “It gave us a much clearer picture of the realities of working in industry and the challenges you’ll have to face.” “This project has been more in-depth than anything we’ve done at school. It’s helped us to understand just what it would be like to do this as a career.” Mentors provide the following: • The Project Brief to aid recruitment of interested ability students. Mentors are offered the opportunity to be involved in this student recruitment through interviews, sifting letters of application etc. • The company retains the intellectual property rights of the project. In 2014 – 2015 70% of projects have actual or potential financial savings for the company • Mentors develop leadership and mentoring skills for their own continued professional development • Potential future recruitment of talented and familiar staff with the employability skills the sponsor company requires. • Mentors get the chance to educate the teachers with industrial knowledge • Mentors develop leadership and mentoring skills for their own continued professional development, including mapping of skills to the UK SPEC for Chartership with professional institutions • Can help meet Corporate Social Responsibility and Community Benefits objectives • Developing relationship with schools and closing the skills gaps • Reaching out in harder to recruit areas Year in Industry - EDT offers a bespoke placement service providing access to the brightest and best students across the UK. We search from hundreds of pre-university and undergraduates to offer companies a year-long placement. The year in industry offers students a paid opportunity to gain vital skills in employment in a supportive environment while working on a real-life project. The year in industry services offer a placement service, support, recognitions and professional development for company staff. Support • EDT mentor to act as quality assurance of the YINI service, and support to both the line manager and student throughout their placement. • Support in how to best utilise their placement year to count towards chartership with a number of institutions. The mentors, often chartered themselves, will support the student in the paperwork, applications and evidence required. Company quote “The Year in Industry provides young intelligent and enthusiastic individuals with open minds and new ideas; ideal for standalone projects. By focusing on their projects, results can often be realised more quickly than relying on overstretched existing company resources.”

20. What could employers do to attract and retain more diverse STEM talent?

What could employers do to attract and retain more diverse STEM talent?
Employers need to engage with schools early and provide a consistent message. However, they to ensure they have the training and ability to engage with schools. Linking with third sector organisation, colleges and universities to provide meaningful engagement at every level. Companies need the vision to realise the challenges they face in recruiting the right talent and invest today for the employees tomorrow. Too many companies can only see a few years ahead - this needs a much longer term approach and investment.