Consultation on The Continuing Care (Scotland) Amendment Order 2018

Closed 13 Nov 2017

Opened 16 Oct 2017

Overview

Section 67 of The Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014 inserts a new section 26A into the Children (Scotland) Act 1995 in relation to continuing care.

Continuing care is defined in new section 26A(4) of the 1995 Act as meaning the same accommodation and other assistance as was being provided for the eligible person by the local authority, immediately before the person ceased to be looked after.

Continuing care reflects the philosophy of care set out in the Scottish Government’s ‘Staying Put-Scotland’ guidance of October 2013. This stressed the importance of encouraging and enabling young people who are looked after to remain in safe, supported environments until they are better ready to make the transition into independent living.

We are delivering our policy intention, as stated during development of the Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014 Act, of increasing the higher age limit for persons eligible for continuing care on an annual basis until the duty to provide continuing care extends from 16 to 21 years of age.

Why We Are Consulting

This draft of The Continuing Care (Scotland) Amendment Order 2018, is the third in the series of planned annual amendment Orders.

This Order will further increase the higher age limit for persons eligible for continuing care from nineteen to twenty years of age from April 2018 to ensure the current cohort of young people continue to be eligible as they increase in age until the duty to provide continuing care extends from 16 to 21 years of age. This relates to powers set out in Part 11 of the Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014 (“the 2014 Act”).

You are being invited to comment on whether you agree with this latest increase of the higher age limit to ensure the current cohort of young people continue to be eligible as they increase in age?

Download the consultation paper.

Audiences

  • People of Scotland

Interests

  • Children and Families
  • Communities and Third Sector
  • Public Sector
  • Health and Social Care