We Asked, You Said, We Did

Below are some of the issues we have recently consulted on and their outcomes.

We asked

We asked for views on a minor amendment to road works legislation. We sought views on the proposal to revoke the Scottish Statutory Instrument,  “The “Scottish Road Works Register (Prescribed Fees) Regulations 2021” and replace it with a new Regulation to account for the overall running cost in the 2022/23 and 2023/24 financial years. 

The projected running cost for 2022/23 will decrease to £882,933 from £915,000, a 4% decrease compared to the current figure. The projected running cost for 2023/24 will increase to £950,387, a 4% increase compared to the current figure.

You said

In total, twenty two responses to the consultation were received, primarily from roads authorities. Brief analysis of these responses is detailed below.

There was strong support for the proposal; all twenty-two responses gave full support for the change. This included fifteen responses from roads authorities, four responses from utility or contracting firms, one from a non-departmental public body with statutory rights to excavate in roads, and two from individuals. Of the four utility returns, two are from the same organisation, albeit covering separate operational areas. For analysis purposes these have been considered as a single response.

Six organisations provided additional comments. Three respondents noted that the current apportionment model was fit for purpose. One respondent noted that a review of the apportionment model would be useful in the ‘near future’. Two organisations, both utility firms, noted that a review of the model with specific regard to roads authority use of the register would be beneficial

We did

The consultation responses have been carefully considered. All of the respondents supported the proposal to replace the 2021 Scottish Statutory Instrument. As a result, we will now revoke the Scottish Statutory Instrument, “The “Scottish Road Works Register (Prescribed Fees) Regulations 2021”, and replace it with a new Regulation as proposed.

We have raised the issue of apportionment with the body that originally provided the apportionment matrix, the Roads Authority and Utility Committee (Scotland). We have asked that the group review the matrix, and return any comment to Transport Scotland officials before October 2024

We asked

In the Scottish Government’s consultation paper "Covid recovery: a consultation on public health, public services and justice system reforms” we asked for your views on our review of the impact of Covid on the Scottish statute book: removing measures no longer needed in order to be able to respond to the Covid pandemic; keeping those where there is demonstrable benefit to the people of Scotland; and considering what new provisions might be made.

Specifically the 12 week full public consultation held between 17 August and 9 November 2021 sought views on:

  • Proposals for greater public health resilience, to protect Scotland against future public health threats;
  • Proposals for public services and justice system reform, to ensure that the benefits of practical modernisations put in place during the pandemic are maintained; and
  • Proposals to respond to the impact of Covid in the justice system specifically, where backlogs have unavoidably built up.

 

You said

The consultation attracted a lot of interest with almost 3,000 responses being received; the majority of those were from individuals. The exact figures were 2,905 valid responses; 2,775 responses from individuals and 130 organisational responses. All responses represent a valid view and no responses were excluded from analysis.

The responses have been analysed by an external contractor, The Lines Between Ltd.  A full consultation report was published on 26 January 2022.

As is further set out in the consultation analysis report, public health resilience proposals elicited a range of views.

In relation to public services and justice system reform, modernisation, efficiency, and flexibility were themes expressed by those who endorsed extending provisions for public services and justice proceedings to be carried out through remote, virtual, or electronic means.

The provisions for tenancies and protection against eviction attracted many responses.

In relation to the impact of Covid in the justice system, many organisations supported conducting court business by electronic means and virtual attendance.

We did

The consultation responses have been carefully considered, alongside other evidence, in relation to the development of a Covid Recovery Bill which was announced in the Programme for Government 2021-22.

The Coronavirus (Recovery and Reform) (Scotland) Bill was introduced to the Scottish Parliament on 25 January 2022.  Further details are available from this webpage.

We asked

We asked for your views on the draft Framework for Tax, specifically we asked for responses to consider new areas that could be included or suggested alterations to existing elements of the Framework as well as more general reflections.

Your views were also sought on how our tax powers should be used in the Scottish Budget for 2022-23 and for the duration of the current Scottish Parliament (2021-2026).

You said

We received a total of 47 responses to the public consultation, with 22 individuals and 25 organisations responding.

The Framework for Tax received positive feedback from a wide range of respondents. The Framework was particularly welcomed for its accessibility, commitment to engagement and its contribution to improving the transparency of Scottish tax policy.

Responses outlined a strong appetite to make the most of existing powers, and to ensure a solid foundation is in place for good practice in tax policy making. Links between different levels of government remain important, with respondents highlighting the need to ensure that the responsibilities of local authorities and the Scottish and UK Governments, as well as fiscal cycles, are clearly articulated.

Respondents expressed a mix of views on how the Scottish Government should use its tax powers moving forward. Some respondents called for stability while we  recover from the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic, and an alignment with UK tax rates. Whereas other respondents called for a more progressive approach to tax, in particular in relation to Income Tax and Council Tax rates.

Additionally, using tax policy to help achieve Net Zero commitments, having a phased approach to increasing Non-Domestic Rates back to pre-pandemic levels, and having a simple, transparent, and easy to use tax system were other key themes in the consultation responses. The consultation analysis report can be viewed in full here.

We did

All of the responses, alongside other evidence, were considered in relation to the draft Framework for Tax and Scottish Budget.

The Scottish Budget for 2022-23 was announced on Thursday 9 December. Our proposed tax policy measures in the Scottish Budget can be found here, while the Scottish Budget 2022-23 document can be accessed here.

The final version of the Framework for Tax was published on Thursday 16 December and can be viewed in full here.

Consultation responses were constructive and provided carefully considered, expert feedback, meaningfully improving the published version of Scotland’s first Framework for Tax.

Two substantive changes include adding a description of the different bodies involved in the development and delivery of tax policy and a reframing of one of Scotland’s tax principles to focus on ‘effectiveness’ enhancing our commitment to tackling tax avoidance activity by designing taxes that minimise opportunities for such activity.

We asked

We asked for your views on draft proposals to extend the effects of a coronavirus related modification to the Public Health etc. (Scotland) Act 2008. This Act includes a duty on Health Boards to provide compensation to those isolating as a result of an infectious disease. This duty was suspended by the UK Coronavirus Act 2020 on a temporary basis as part of legislative modifications deemed necessary during the pandemic.

The compensation duty in the 2008 Act was predominantly developed to address the support people who find themselves isolating would require where there was small-scale outbreaks of notifiable infectious diseases rather than to provide support at the scale that would have been required throughout Covid-19 pandemic.

Given the scale of support required for the large numbers of people who have been required to isolate, it has been considered a more proportionate use of public resources to introduce COVID-19 specific support schemes. These have included:

  • the Self-Isolation Support Grant (SISG), a £500 payment for people who earn less than the living wage who are required to self-isolate;
  • the National Assistance Helpline (NAH), a central support phone line that people self-isolating can call to engage the relevant local authority team who can triage their need for support whilst isolating; and
  • the Local Self-Isolation Assistance Service (LSIAS), a pro-active service that phones people self-isolating who wish to receive the service to consider whether they require support with access to food, essential medication or other local voluntary sector and statutory services.

The proposal set out in the consultation was to bring forward primary legislation that would:

  • extend the effects of the existing modification to the 2008 Act relating to compensation from the date the legislation was in force to 30 October 2022;
  • set out reporting requirements to Parliament relating to the ongoing suspension of the provisions in the 2008 Act; and
  • provide regulation making powers so that the expiry date of the suspension – when the duty on Health Boards would once again be in place – could be brought forward or extended.

We asked for your views on whether you agreed with the proposals, whether you agreed the Scottish Government should have powers to extend or expire them early, and on the conditions that should apply to using those powers.

You said

We received a total of 14 responses to the public consultation. Of the 14 responses, 5 were received from individuals representing organisations and 9 were received from members of the public.

Overall, responses to the consultation were in favour of the proposed changes, with 78.5% of respondents agreeing with the proposal to modify the duty on Health Boards to make the payment of compensation related to self-isolation for COVID-19 discretionary; 78.5% of respondents were also in favour of the Scottish Government having the ability to vary the expiry date of these provisions - with 92.8% of respondents agreeing that these factors are the most appropriate consideration for the Scottish Government to take into account when considering extending or bringing forward the expiry date for these provisions.

Much of the written feedback received related to the need to ensure that isolation support, and support relating to Covid more generally, is provided at the right level and that there is sufficient public awareness for people affected by COVID-19.  This included comments relating to the levels of isolation support provided, the need to provide sufficient financial support and on some of the differential impact of COVID-19 on some groups with protected characteristics.

We did

We have published non-confidential responses to the consultation and an analysis of the consultation responses.  Preparations are now underway for new regulation and the feedback received from this consultation will help shape that process.

Written feedback provided relating to levels of isolation support, views on COVID-19 support more broadly and the financial and other impacts on people of having to self-isolate have been passed to the relevant policy teams in the Scottish Government for further consideration.  This feedback will inform the ongoing consideration of isolation support for COVID-19 into the next stages of the pandemic, as well as how best Scottish Government can work with public and voluntary sector partners to minimise the differential impact that COVID-19 has across a range of different communities within the population.

It is our conclusion that the proposals can be taken forward and presented to Parliament for scrutiny.

The full analysis report can be found at: Coronavirus (Discretionary Compensation for Self-Isolation) Bill Consultation - Analysis and Response - gov.scot (www.gov.scot)

Published responses

View submitted responses where consent has been given to publish the response.

We asked

The Transport (Scotland) Act 2019 introduced a discretionary workplace parking licensing (WPL) power available to local authorities. It will be for the local authority to decide whether they wish to use that power and to shape proposals to suit local circumstances.

As part of our commitment to reduce car kilometres by 20% by 2030, the Climate Change Plan update committed to take forward policy consultation in advance of drafting regulations and guidance to enable local authorities to implement WPL schemes that suit their local requirements. Providing local authorities with discretionary powers to implement a WPL scheme supports National Transportation Strategy outcomes of reducing congestion and tackling climate/air emissions.

We asked for your views on certain technical elements of the Workplace Parking Licensing (WPL) regulations and guidance that will underpin local authorities’ WPL schemes, and what potential impacts of the regulations and guidance may be expected.

You said

We received 62 responses to the consultation, of which 37 were from organisations and 25 from individuals. A number of key themes were evident across consultation questions as well as across respondent groups. Some of these were outwith the scope of the consultation and were general comments on WPL and, as such, will be more appropriate for local authorities to consider when designing and implementing local WPL schemes.

Key themes include the importance of transparency and accountability in WPL schemes, the importance of alternative modes of transport. Some respondents raised concerns that WPL schemes will disproportionately impact low paid and shift workers and city centre businesses.

We did

An analysis of the responses to the consultation has been published on the Transport Scotland website, and responses published where respondents indicated permission to do so. The responses to the consultation will help inform the supporting regulations and guidance to enable local authorities to implement WPL schemes that suit their local circumstances.

As set out in the Climate Change Plan update, the intention is for regulations and guidance to be in force in 2022.

We asked

The first phase of this study, the Initial Appraisal (Case for Change), was published in March 2021 and concluded that there was evidence for a ‘Case for Change’ within the study area.  We are now progressing through the Preliminary Appraisal stage of this process which involves reviewing the four Transport Planning Objectives agreed with stakeholders against a number of potential short, medium and long term intervention options and consulting with the public to understand wider views on each of these options.

For the Public Consultation we provided consultation material and a webinar, with a feedback form to record your views.  We asked for your views on a series of potential measures to improve safety on the A9 between North Kessock and Tore, including speed reduction and monitoring, junction and road layout improvements, public transport improvements and upgraded facilities for non-motorised users. These were split into packages according to their ease of implementation and potential construction timescales.

You said

We received 753 responses submitted via the online consultation platform Citizen Space, with another 3 via email.  Most of the responses were positive towards the proposed safety improvements North Kessock and Tore.  The responses that received predominantly positive feedback were generally regarding signage and visibility. Enhanced cyclist signage, road markings and installation of street lighting received overwhelmingly positive responses as well as prohibiting certain vehicle movements such as U-turns. The prohibition of right-turns to and from the A9 were more evenly rated, but with a marginally positive score.  Options which proposed to reduce speed limits or impose enforcement measures such as safety cameras were not preferred overall and received negative responses on the whole. Additionally, the option to install traffic signals at the Tore Roundabout was seen as a negative impact. Responses applying to active travel provision measures such as a controlled pedestrian crossing at Tore Roundabout were mixed.  The suggestion of a pedestrian bridge or underpass at Tore Roundabout received very positive responses.  Options concerning active travel integration and improvement of pedestrian routes had neutral responses, with additional supporting comments suggesting that the some respondents did not perceive an issue, or they did not partake in active travel and therefore could not form an opinion.  Long-term options to improve Munlochy junction with as a roundabout or the creation of a single junction along with Artafallie received fairly mixed response, but the proposal for a grade-separated junction was overwhelmingly positive.

We did

An analysis of the responses to the consultation has been published on the Transport Scotland website The responses to the consultation will help inform the development of the safety improvements between North Kessock and Tore, and form part of the ongoing appraisal.  

We asked

We sought views on a draft of the Aquaculture Code of Practice: Containment of and Prevention of Escape of Fish on Fish Farms in relation to Marine Mammal Interactions. We also asked for people’s views on accompanying reporting forms and a partial Business Regulatory Impact Assessment (BRIA).

A public consultation took place between 22 June 2021 and 3 August 2021.

You said

We received 39 responses to the consultation of which 20 were from organisations and 19 from members of the public. We have published the responses received where the respondent has given permission for us to do so.

The majority of responses supported introduction of the Code of Practice with a range of comments and constructive suggestions for revision and improvement.

We did

We published an analysis of the consultation responses:

https://www.gov.scot/isbn/9781802014037

We completed and published a BRIA:

https://www.gov.scot/isbn/9781802013993

The response to the consultation has been incorporated into the final version of the Code of Practice which is published on the Scottish Government website:

https://www.gov.scot/isbn/9781802014006

We asked

We asked for your views on draft proposals aimed at improving the regulations surrounding Experimental Orders for all Road Authorities in Scotland.  We also sought your views on the potential need for changing the regulations that govern Redetermination Orders and Loading Bays. 

You said

We received a total of 450 responses to the public consultation.  In relation to ETROs, many individuals, organisations and local authorities are not content with the current system (71%). 

When considering responses to Loading Bays and Redetermination Orders there was clear division in the types of responses received. It is our conclusion that further work is required to assess the demand for legislative change in these areas. 

We did

We have published non-confidential responses to the consultation and an analysis of the consultation responses (link below).  Preparations are now underway for new regulations and the feedback received from this consultation will help shape that process.

The full analysis report can be found at;

https://www.transport.gov.scot/publication/consultation-on-traffic-regulation-orders-public-consultation-analysis-report/

We asked

We sought views on proposals for regulations on the preparation, submission and registration of Local Place Plans. We also asked for people’s views on the accompanying impact assessments.

A public consultation took place between 15 March 2021 and 25 June 2021.

You said

We received over 200 responses to the consultation of which 37 were from community councils / trusts and 62 individuals. Other responses were received from the public sector, including planning authorities, and developers / business interests.

We did

Craigforth was commissioned to undertake an independent analysis of responses.  The report presents the findings from the public consultation and explains the methodology that was used to analyse responses.

Where permission to publish has been provided, the consultation responses are now available to view online.

The responses, together with the analysis report, have informed and shaped the regulations which will be laid in the Scottish Parliament in Autumn 2021. The responses will also assist in the development of accompanying guidance.

We asked

We asked for your views on whether provision of free bus travel to all young people aged under 22 would have an effect on island communities which is significantly different from the effect on other communities in Scotland, and if so, what measures the Scottish Government might consider to mitigate any adverse effects on island communities in relation to the provision of free bus travel for those aged under 22 specifically. This consultation was undertaken between 24 May 2021 and 21 June 2021.

You said

We received 151 responses from individuals and organisations to the consultation. The majority of these responses supported free bus travel for under 22s noting it would have positive impacts on young people in island communities. However a number raised concerns about its application in island communities. Key issues raised were lack of bus services in island communities; potential loss of revenue for Regional Transport Partnerships and/or Local Authorities; and the scheme only applying to buses and not ferries or air travel. Where permission to publish has been provided, the consultation responses are now available to view online.

We did

The consultation responses were considered as part of the Island Communities Impact Assessment (ICIA) that was undertaken in relation to the free bus scheme.  The published ICIA is available at The National Bus Travel Concession Scheme for Young Persons (Scotland) Amendment Order 2021 (transport.gov.scot) 

We asked

We consulted on a series of questions relating to the qualifying criteria for  pardoning Miners convicted of certain offences relating to the Miners' Strike of 1984-85.

You said

The findings from the consultative response indicated that there was broad support for the pardon and that the only relevant qualifying criteria should be the range of offences to be covered by the pardon.

We did

A Miners Strike Pardons Bill was announced in September 2021 as part of the Scottish Government's 2021-22 legislative programme.

The findings of the consultative response alongside other available evidence were used to inform the preparation of the Bill.

The Bill was introduced to the Scottish Parliament on 27 October 2021 and has been published

The Scottish Parliament is currently seeking views from the public on the Bill as introduced.

We asked

The landmark Forensic Medical Services (Victims of Sexual Offences) (Scotland) Act 2021 was unanimously passed by the Scottish Parliament on 10 December 2020 and received Royal Assent on 20 January 2021.

We published the Scottish Government consultation “Self-referral forensic medical services - retention period for evidence: consultation” which ran for 12 weeks, between 5 February and 30 April 2021.

We asked if people agreed with the Scottish Government recommendation to set the retention period for evidence collected in the course of self-referral forensic medical examinations at 26 months.

We also asked if further impact assessments should be carried out with regards to this matter.

You said

A total of 63 valid responses were received to the consultation from 30 individuals and 33 organisations. The 33 organisations who responded included health boards, victim support organisations, justice organisations, educational organisations and organisations representing specific groups/ equalities.

The key findings were: 

  • 50.8% (32 out of 63) of respondents agreed with the proposed 26 months retention period.
  • 4.8% (3 out of 63) of respondents disagreed with 26 months and felt it should be shorter.
  • 36.5% (23 out of 63) of respondents disagreed with 26 months and felt it should be longer.
  • 1.6% (1 out of 3) of respondents were unsure if they supported 26 months.
  • 6.3% (4 out of 63) of respondents did not answer the question.

There was no consensus both in terms of whether the retention period should be longer or shorter, or what a longer or shorter period should be. 

No respondents suggested any further impact assessments were needed.   

We did

Based on responses to the consultation and all the evidence gathered the Scottish Government proposes to set a retention period of 26 months under regulations, these will be subject to approval by the Scottish Parliament early in 2022.  

The 26 month period aims to strike the right balance between ensuring that evidence is held for a reasonable timescale, should an individual decide to report to the police, and the practical considerations on health boards if required to retain evidence for lengthy periods of time.  The retention period will be kept under review as data and further evidence emerges in the future.

We published the analysis report of responses on the Scottish Government website on 22 November 2021 https://www.gov.scot/isbn/9781802016246  

Where consent was given to do so we have published the responses to the consultation.

We asked

The Abortion (Scotland) Regulations 1991 set out requirements which must be met in relation to notifications of abortion made to the CMO.  The Regulations require that notifications must be completed on a paper form (commonly referred to as the ‘yellow form’) and sent by post or delivered in a sealed envelope to the CMO within seven days of the termination. The required information to be provided on the yellow form is set out in the Regulations and requires certain information to be provided about the abortion carried out. The CMO’s office then deliver the notification forms to Public Health Scotland (PHS), which uses the information in the form to prepare the abortion statistics.

The consultation proposed that the Regulations should be amended to enable the notification of an abortion to be sent electronically in future and sought views on the timeframe within which notifications must be made. The consultation also proposed changes to the content of the notification itself. The proposals would mean that providers would in future only provide a simple notification confirming that an abortion had been carried out to the CMO and so would no longer need to submit the yellow notification forms. Further details of the abortion would be submitted directly to PHS via secure electronic means, to allow it to produce abortion statistics.

You said

35 responses were submitted to the consultation, including fifteen from organisations. Overall, responses to the consultation were in favour of the proposed changes, with the greatest support for enabling electronic submission of notifications (91%), followed by permitting a period longer than seven days in which to do so (79% of those who answered the question) and enabling data to be provided directly to PHS (73% of those who answered the question).  There was more of a split in relation to perceived impacts on privacy of personal data about patients and staff, with 45% suggesting that there would be an impact and 34% suggesting there would not.

Comments in support of the specific proposals mainly focused on the benefits in terms of streamlining processes, providing increased flexibility and increased data privacy.  The future data requirements was a key area of focus for those who caveated their support for the proposals, including the need to ensure transparency about data requirements and the opportunities for increased/improved data collection.  Responses also focused on the practicalities of moving from one system to another and the need to ensure synchronisation and no data loss as a result.

We did

An analysis of the responses to the consultation has been published on the Scottish Government website and can be viewed here:  https://www.gov.scot/ISBN/9781802010749 Where consent to publish has been provided, the consultation responses are now available to view online.

The responses to the consultation will help inform the development of Regulations to amend the Abortion (Scotland) Regulations 1991.  

We asked

We invited stakeholders to respond to a range of proposed updates to The Water Environment (Controlled Activities) (Scotland) Regulations 2011 (“CAR”). Including:

  • Proposed consolidation of The (Control of Pollution) (Silage, Slurry and Agricultural Fuel Oil) (Scotland) Regulations 2003 into CAR as a set of general binding rules,
  • Modernisation of those provisions to take account of recent changes in land use practice; and
  • Miscellaneous revisions to various existing general binding rules within Schedule 3 of CAR.   

 

 

You said

The key concern raised by some respondents was the perceived cost to bring the currently exempt silage and slurry structures up to compliance with the SSAFO standards. Other respondents considered it appropriate that the regulations were being updated to keep pace with current good agricultural practice and encourage better nutrient management practice

 NFU Scotland recognised the need for farmers to improve their current practices but highlighted that applying a British Standard requirement to the upgrading of old slurry stores could bring unacceptably high costs. They were supportive of the measures to improve application of slurries and digestate and the reduction of emissions.

We did

After fully considering the responses, to the consultation, Scottish Government took into account the potential cost implications of bringing pre 1991 silage and slurry facilities up to full compliance with the British Standards in the regulations.

A discussion was held with sector representative NFU Scotland, and a revised proposal for pre 1991 silage and slurry stores was put forward which removed the exemption for pre 1991 stores but required them to be fit for purpose, but without certain aspects of construction requiring compliance with British Standards.

The revised proposals were considered appropriate by NFU Scotland and were taken forward into final regulations along with the other proposals consulted upon.    

We asked

We asked you to comment on the draft Public Engagement Strategy for Climate Change, which provides a framework for engaging Scotland’s citizens in the transition to net zero emissions by 2045.

A consultation on the draft strategy was open for over three months, from 16 December 2020 to 31 March 2021. Through 19 open consultation questions, we asked for your views on important aspects of the strategy including the overall approach, strategic objectives and principles, the green recovery, COP26 and monitoring and evaluation.

You said

We received 178 responses to the consultation: 139 submitted via the online consultation platform Citizen Space and a further 39 submitted by email in an alternative format. 40 responses were from individuals and 138 from organisations.

A range of informed individuals and stakeholders shared their views and ambitions for how the Scottish Government can successfully communicate with individuals and communities and encourage the public’s participation in decision making. Your responses provide an essential evidence base for the Scottish Government to draw upon when developing and implementing the final Public Engagement Strategy.

We have published the responses received on https://consult.gov.scot where the respondent has given permission for us to do so. 

We did

We published the analysis of the consultation responses, completed by independent social research company The Lines Between.

There is evidence across responses that the strategy is welcomed, with broad endorsement of the objectives and principles included in the approach. As such, we will retain the broad objectives, principles and approach detailed within the strategy.

Some of the more significant points in the analysis included:

  • Include more detail on activities – we will include more detail on previous and planned activities and use a range of short case studies to showcase best practice. We will also include a Theory of Change model to show how input and activities translate to outputs, outcomes and impacts.
  • Show how activities relate back to the objectives and principles – we will use a range of icons and/or coloured text to clearly highlight where activities align with and contribute to the objectives and principles.
  • Consider language and wording of the principles – we will include more detail on each principle, and consider the language, particularly around ‘dialogue’ and ‘people’.
  • Not to add any new objectives – we will not add any new objectives.

Some of the other points in the analysis included:

  • Link the strategy to wider climate change context and other strategies – we will highlight links to the National Performance framework, Climate Change Plan update and Participation Framework.
  • Strong support for the use of trusted messengers – we will retain the emphasis on the use of trusted messengers and add further detail on who they are and how they will be supported.
  • Strong support for deliberative approaches and the Climate Assembly – we will include lessons learnt from the Climate Assembly and more detail on community climate action and youth participation and how these groups are supported to participate.
  • Scottish Government to collaborate with a range of organisations and sectors and use a range of communication channels – we will include detail on how we intend to work with other organisations and sectors and set out the channels we intend to use and how we will reach those least engaged.
  • Ensure communication is sufficient in scope, clear and relevant – we will commit to raising awareness of climate terms, avoiding technical terms, having clear and consistent messaging on action in Plain English and tailoring messaging to different audiences.
  • Highlight the positive benefits of a green recovery – we will include more detail on the co-benefits of a green recovery and emphasise that all sectors have a role to play.
  • COP26 being a unique opportunity to engage the public around climate change – we will include details of our COP26 public engagement work.
  • Accessibility of the strategy – we will produce the final strategy in PDF, html, Easy Read, large print and BSL formats to increase accessibility.
  • Monitoring and evaluation – in line with feedback we will commit to producing progress reports and an end-of-life evaluation, using a range of qualitative and quantitative methods, and using clear language and visuals to ensure inclusivity and accessibility.

The response to the consultation will be incorporated into the final version of the Public Engagement Strategy, which will be published on the Scottish Government website in September.

We asked

We sought views on draft guidance on the promotion and use of mediation in the Scottish planning system, primarily in pre-application consultation and in development planning. We also asked for people’s views on potential links with the fourth National Planning Framework and new development  planning provisions.

A public consultation took place between 15 December 2020 and 12 March 2021.

You said

We received 41 responses to the consultation of which 31 were from groups/organisations and 10 from members of the public.

We did

Craigforth were commissioned to undertake an independent analysis of all responses.  The report Planning system - promotion and use of mediation - draft guidance: consultation analysis presents the findings from the public consultation and explains the methodology that was used to analyse responses.

Where permission to publish has been provided, the consultation responses are now available to view online.

The responses, together with the analysis report, have informed and shaped the guidance in Planning Circular 2/2021 - planning system - promotion and use of mediation: guidance which was published on 21 July 2021.  

In light of the consultation responses, we are currently considering how the use of mediation can be supported through National Planning Framework 4 and what, if any, scope there may be for further links with the new development plan system.

We asked

We sought views on high-level proposals for the introduction of regulations which would require new homes, consented from 2024, to only use heating systems which produced zero direct greenhouse gas emissions (at the point of use) through an initial scoping consultation. This public consultation took place between 9 December 2020 and 3 March 2021.

We also asked for people’s views on a number of key outcomes to be achieved in this transition to zero direct emissions heating within new builds, as well as the challenges these proposals presented for industry and consumers alike.

We also held a number of online, themed workshops during the consultation period, to give stakeholders an opportunity to raise their thoughts directly with us. These focussed on the themes of: consumers; business and industry; island communities; and the treatment of non-domestic buildings. 

You said

We received 92 responses to the consultation, of which 83 were from businesses and the public sector – with the remaining 9 from individuals. Responses were received from a variety of different organisations and interest groups, including local authorities, housing developers and trade bodies representing the energy sector.

We have published the responses received on https://consult.gov.scot where the respondent has given permission for us to do so. 

We did

Why Research were commissioned to undertake an independent analysis of responsesThe report presents the findings from the public consultation and explains the methodology that was used to analyse responses.

The responses received to the consultation were, generally, supportive of both our intentions to introduce regulations around zero direct emissions heating, as well as the key outcomes we hope to achieve in doing so.

The responses, together with the analysis report, will help to inform and shape the regulations which will be laid in the Scottish Parliament prior to taking effect from 2024. Before then, it is our intention to give stakeholders a further opportunity to input into the development of the regulations.

We asked

Following on from a previous consultation in 2019 we asked specific questions on how proposals put forward by the Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR) about improvements to charity regulation in Scotland could be implemented.

The proposals broadly focus on changes to charity law that would increase transparency and accountability in charities and enhance regulatory powers for OSCR. The aim being to maintain public trust and confidence in charities and OSCR.

You said

We received 100 responses to the survey from a range of individuals, charitable organisations and others with an interest in charity law. 

The majority of respondents showed continuing support for the proposals in the survey and ways in which they could be achieved.

We did

We have published the responses that gave permission and an analysis report of the survey responses: Analysis Of Responses To Engagement On Strengthening Scottish Charity Law - gov.scot (www.gov.scot).

We will continue to work with OSCR to establish the practical implications of the proposals on the organisation and publish the next steps before the end of the year.

We asked

We sought views on the National Planning Framework 4: Position Statement, It set out the Scottish Government's thinking on the issues that would need to be addressed when preparing Scotland's fourth National Planning Framework (NPF4).  It drew on the ideas and evidence we received from a broad range of people and organisations through our early engagement programme.

 

A public consultation took place between November 2020 and February 2021.

You said

The views of stakeholders and the public were sought on the Position Statement. 

 

Over 250 responses were received through the consultation. There was broad support for:

  • the general direction of NPF4 and the ambition for climate change to be the overarching priority;
  • embedding UN Sustainable Development Goals and Scotland's national outcomes;
  • the four key outcomes set out in the Position Statement (Net-Zero Emissions; Resilient Communities; A Wellbeing Economy; and Better, Greener Places); and
  • a focus on the Place Principle.

 

Craigforth was commissioned to undertake an independent analysis of responses.  The report presents the findings from the public consultation and explains the methodology that was used to analyse responses. Where permission to publish has been provided, the consultation responses are now available to view online.

We did

The responses, together with the analysis report, have informed and shaped the Draft NPF4 which was laid in the Scottish Parliament on 10 November 2021. The Draft NPF4 is subject to consultation until 31 March 2022. Further details of the consultation, and resources to support the consultation, can be found at www.transformingplanning.scot.

 

Once approved by the Scottish Parliament and adopted by the Scottish Ministers (expected during 2022), the plan will become part of the statutory development plan and will directly influence planning decisions.  

We asked

We asked for your views on our draft recovery plan for the manufacturing sector – Making Scotland’s Future: A Recovery Plan for Manufacturing.

You said

We received a total of 53 responses. The majority of responses (43) were submitted through the Scottish Government's Citizen Space consultation hub. The remaining were submitted via email.  41 responses were from organisations with the remaining 12 from individuals.

We have published the responses received where the respondent has given permission for us to do so.

We did

We published an analysis of the consultation responses:

Manufacturing recovery plan: consultation analysis – March 2021 - gov.scot (www.gov.scot)

The response to the consultation has been incorporated into the final version of the plan which is published on the Scottish Government website:

Making Scotland's Future: A Recovery Plan For Manufacturing Final – June 2021 - gov.scot (www.gov.scot)